Is cursive writing important to child development?

Legislators push to keep cursive in their schools' curricula, but experts seem split as to whether it's necessary.

Tracy Burns checks her third grade student Nikolai Wilkins' cursive writing during class. (Photo: Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
  • Ohio has joined many other states in reestablishing cursive in their schools' curricula.
  • Research shows the value handwriting has for developing children's fine motor skills and a connection between words and memory.
  • But experts seem split on whether it's a question of print vs. cursive, or cognitive fluency vs. disconnect.
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Child abuse cases quadruple when report cards are sent home on Fridays

Florida researchers offer schools a simple message: Send home report cards earlier in the week.

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash
  • Researchers discovered a four-fold increase in verified cases of child abuse when report cards were sent home on Friday as compared to other days.
  • Corporal punishment is legal throughout America, including in many public and most private schools.
  • A child is hit, on average, every 30 seconds in American public schools.
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30% of children received trust issues from 'Santa'

Are parents being naughty or nice?

Photo credit: Mike Arney on Unsplash
  • New survey looks at how former children feel about being lied to by parents about Santa.
  • 72 percent of former believers keep the Santa myth alive for their own kids.
  • At press time, about 1,200 people have taken the survey.
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Drug prevention advice for parents

How to talk to kids responsibly about drugs.

  • The majority of kids are going to experiment with drugs at some point in their lives, mostly in their teens and early 20s.
  • While many parents might balk at allowing their children to experiment, it's important to remember that not all drugs are the same.
  • There are some warning signs, however. Neuroscience journalist Maia Szalavitz walks us through some of the signs to look out for.

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The boozy and violent story behind America's Eggnog Riot

It's hard to get off of the couch after a few eggnogs, let alone destroy public property.

Big Think
  • In 1826, Americans loved to drink, and the young cadets at West Point Academy were no exception.
  • After being forbidden from imbibing everyone's favorite egg-based holiday beverage, West Point cadets would go on to start a riot that lasted into the early hours of Christmas morning.
  • The story behind the Eggnog Riot both offers a glimpse into life in 1826 and the history behind how West Point became the disciplined institution it is today.
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