New research shows that bullies are often friends

Remedies must honor the complex social dynamics of adolescence.

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  • Bullies are likely to be friends according to new research published in the American Journal of Sociology.
  • The researchers write that complex social dynamics among adolescents allow the conditions for intragroup dominance.
  • The team uses the concept of "frenemies" to describe the relationship between many bullies and victims.
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Could playing video games be linked to lower depression rates in kids?

Can playing video games really curb the risk of depression? Experts weigh in.

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  • A new study published by a UCL researcher has demonstrated how different types of screen time can positively (or negatively) influence young people's mental health.
  • Young boys who played video games daily had lower depression scores at age 14 compared to those who played less than once per month or never.
  • The study also noted that more frequent video game use was consistently associated with fewer depressive symptoms in boys with lower physical activity, but not in those with high physical activity levels.
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What is the purpose of universities?

For centuries, universities have advanced humanity toward truth. Professor Jonathan Haidt speaks to why college campuses are suddenly heading in the opposite direction.

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  • In a lecture at UCCS, NYU professor Jonathan Haidt considers the 'telos' or purpose of universities: To discover truth.
  • Universities that prioritize the emotional comfort of students over the pursuit of truth fail to deliver on that purpose, at a great societal cost.
  • To make that point, Haidt quotes CNN contributor Van Jones: "I don't want you to be safe ideologically. I don't want you to be safe emotionally. I want you to be strong—that's different."
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Want Americans to graduate college? Make it affordable.

Research from MIT's School Effectiveness & Inequality Initiative found making college more affordable cut dropout rates and boosted degree attainment.

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  • Many of the fastest-growing jobs in the U.S. require a postsecondary education, while college tuition rates continue to climb.
  • Recent research finds that making college more affordable improves bachelor degree attainment.
  • Aid recipients who benefit most are students from historically underrepresented groups.
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    Yes, more and more young adults are living with their parents – but is that necessarily bad?

    Having grown kids still at home is not likely to do you, or them, any permanent harm.

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    When the Pew Research Center recently reported that the proportion of 18-to-29-year-old Americans who live with their parents has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, perhaps you saw some of the breathless headlines hyping how it's higher than at any time since the Great Depression.

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