Criminal reform: Why wake-up calls are windows of opportunity

Here's how we can use the concept of 'impact impression' for criminal reform.

  • In his work in criminal reform, Bishop Omar Jahwar recounts how a person's life trajectory can typically be traced back to a moment of trauma or an 'impact impression'.
  • An impact impression has two outcomes: It can be an awakening that steers people in a positive direction where they seek help, or it can become a negative spiral that lands them in prison. In the latter case, supporting people in undoing the damage and mental scars they've incurred from such impact impressions can help reduce recidivism.
  • The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect.
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation

Revolt on the horizon? How young people really feel about digital technology

GenTech aren't happy about how their data is being collected and used.

As digital technologies facilitate the growth of both new and incumbent organisations, we have started to see the darker sides of the digital economy unravel.

Keep reading Show less
Technology & Innovation

Wear a wristband if you can't pay for lunch? The dilemma of school lunch shaming.

A recent incident in Rhode Island highlights the ongoing problem of student debt.

Staff photo by Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images
  • Students in the Warwick school district were informed that unpaid debts would result in cold sandwiches for lunch.
  • An uproar ensued from irate parents and celebrities, accusing the district of lunch shaming.
  • 76 percent of American school districts currently have school lunch debt.
Keep reading Show less
Politics & Current Affairs

Stressing about aging damages your brain, shortens your life

Dementia, disrespect, and loneliness – that is not your future, says aging expert Ashton Applewhite.

  • The best anti-aging advice? Stop stereotyping old people! Cultural messaging about the pitfalls of old age causes undue stress that prematurely ages the brain and shortens life spans.
  • People who have a positive outlook on aging can live 7.5 years longer than those who buy into cultural stereotypes about getting old.
  • It's important to look at the positives of aging, not just the risk factors: Alzheimer's rates are declining, 'mental sifting' can make us wiser, and older workers injure themselves less often than younger workers.
Keep reading Show less
Videos

20% of elderly Americans are either employed or looking for work. Here's why.

Two new reports highlight the stark realities of the modern workforce.

Miguel Angel Martinez Sarmiento works as a barista in a branch of the US coffee house 'Starbucks' and pours milk into a can. All the employees at the coffee shop, which opened in Del Valle Sur at the beginning of September, are over 60 years old. (Photo by Antonia Märzhäuser/picture alliance via Getty Images)
  • For the first time, over 20 percent of senior citizens are working or looking for employment.
  • By contrast, over half of millennials believe they will be millionaires despite contradictory evidence.
  • Regardless of age, the question remains: Is work meaningful when the main goal is a paycheck?
Keep reading Show less
Personal Growth