Why American culture gets mistakes all wrong

Mistakes are part of learning, not a failure of character.

A young woman smokes a cigarette during a break outside an office building on May 4, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. Smoking is banned in Germany in restaurants and most indoor venues. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
  • Americans treat mistakes as character flaws, write Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson.
  • The Japanese, by contrast, treat errors as an essential part of personal growth.
  • Coming clean about our mistakes helps us earn trust and feel better about ourselves.
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Jordan Peterson on the art of forgiveness

Owning your mistakes matters.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 26: Jordan Peterson speaks at ICC Sydney Theatre on February 26, 2019 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Don Arnold/WireImage)
  • Jordan Peterson says that recognizing your mistakes is essential, but you shouldn't "beat yourself to death" because of them.
  • Atoning and repenting for mistakes clear the path for personal growth.
  • If you avoid the responsibility of your errors, however, you're likely to make them again and again.
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I reported the news in print and online. Here’s the difference.

Former NYTimes executive editor Jill Abramson dissects the big problem with internet news.

  • Jill Abramson, former executive editor of The New York Times, describes what life was like for a journalist in the 1980s – a "stone age" when news was governed by the printing press schedule.
  • Today, many journalists will break stories on Twitter before writing it, eliminating nuance and increasing the chance of error.
  • Social media in particular has added a fatal speed to journalism. Errors erode public trust in the media, and allow those in power to undermine the free press.
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Can relationship anarchy create a world without heartbreak?

Nurturing several relationships at once can empower us to build a life so rich that when we lose one love among many, we don't feel as if we've lost 'everything.'

Can you imagine a world without heartbreak? Not without sadness, disappointment or regret – but a world without the sinking, searing, all-consuming ache of lost love. A world without heartbreak is also a world where simple acts cannot be transformed, as if by sorcery, into moments of sublime significance. Because a world without heartbreak is a world without love – isn't it?

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11 Esther Perel quotes that set the record straight on love and sex

The Belgian psychotherapist has a lot to teach us.

  • The idea of the "one" sets us up for unrealistic expectations.
  • Communication relies on honest conversation and plenty of listening.
  • Change yourself, Perel writes, don't try to change your partner.
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