Why we have breakup sex, according to psychology

Is breakup sex ever a good idea?

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  • A July 2020 study aimed to better understand post-breakup behavior, specifically why we have breakup sex.
  • This research established there are three main reasons people engage in breakup sex: relationship maintenance, ambivalence, and hedonism.
  • Experts weigh in on whether or not breakup sex can be beneficial.
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Science says you should pet your dog before leaving

A study explores how your dog does when you're not home.

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  • Just exactly how much are dogs upset when we leave?
  • A new study finds that dogs spend time looking for us after we're gone.
  • The experiment also found that dogs are more relaxed when we give them an affectionate, gentle petting before leaving.
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Study: Militarization of police does not reduce crime

A new look at existing data by LSU researchers refutes the Trump administration's claims.

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  • The United States Department of Defense gifts surplus military equipment and clothing to local police departments.
  • The militarization of police coincides with a significant loss of trust in law enforcement from the American public.
  • Militarized police departments are more likely to interact violently with their communities.
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Should facial recognition software be banned on college campuses?

A heated debate is occurring at the University of Miami.

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  • Students say they were identified with facial recognition technology after a protest at the University of Miami; campus police claim this isn't true.
  • Over 60 universities nationwide have banned facial recognition; a few colleges, such as USC, regularly use it.
  • Civil rights groups in Miami have called for the University of Miami to have talks on this topic.

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What blinking slowly means to cats, according to science

Scientists confirm that slow blinks are an effective way to connect with a cat.

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  • Cats accept the presence of humans with whom they exchange a slow blink.
  • A slow blink is likely a visual statement of nonaggression.
  • Owners and strangers alike can bond with a cat using the slow-blink greeting.
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