Eating noises make you crazy? You have misophonia

People who go ballistic over other people's eating sounds aren't just cranky — they have misophonia.

Credit: Usman Yousaf/Unsplash
  • Some people are driven absolutely bonkers when they hear other people eating or even breathing.
  • Such people likely have a condition called "misophonia," or "hatred of sound."
  • fMRI brain scans reveal a surprising cause for the condition.
Keep reading Show less

Your voice might reveal personality traits

The way you speak might reveal a lot about you, such as your willingness to engage in casual sex.

JOSEP LAGO via Getty Images
  • A new study finds a deeper voice is associated with self-reported extraversion, dominance, and casual sex.
  • It was the first study on the topic to objectively measure voice pitch.
  • The authors suggest that hormones like testosterone might explain their findings.
Keep reading Show less

The problem with our noisy planet

Noise causes stress. For our ancestors, it meant danger: thunder, animal roars, war cries, triggering a 'fight or run' reaction.

CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP via Getty Images

Noise is a belittled threat that disrupts the functioning of people, animals, even plants. It causes stress, provokes aggression, increases the risk of heart disease. Blocking the issue of noise can bring catastrophic consequences for us.

Keep reading Show less

Neanderthals could produce and hear human speech, new study finds

Their ear structures were not that different from ours.

Credit: Mercedes Conde-Valverde/University of Binghamton
  • Neanderthals are emerging as having been much more advanced than previously suspected.
  • Analysis of ear structures indicated by fossilized remains suggests they had everything they needed for understanding the subtleties of speech.
  • The study also concludes that Neanderthals could produce the consonants required for a rich spoken language.
Keep reading Show less

Why some people think they hear the voices of the dead

A new study looks at why mysterious voices are sometimes taken as spirits and other times as symptoms of mental health issues.

Credit: Photographee.eu/Adobe Stock
  • Both spiritualist mediums and schizophrenics hear voices.
  • For the former, this constitutes a gift; for the latter, mental illness.
  • A study explores what the two phenomena have in common.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast