Deer antlers are a 'controlled' form of bone cancer growth

Future cancer research may come from studying antler growth.

Photo credit: Markus Bürkle from Pexels
  • Antlers in ruminants (deer, moose, elk and reindeer) can grow up to half a meter in one month.
  • Researchers studying their genomes have found how they do it.
  • Genes that both activate and turn off cancer are important to this process.
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Surprising Science

Bitcoin mining uses as much energy as mining for gold, study finds

What does it mean for the future of the cryptocurrency movement and its impact on the environment?

  • New study reveals that mining crypto can be use more energy than mine for gold.
  • In order to understand the findings, we must first understand what crypto mining is.
  • The crypto community is looking for a way to solve these issue.
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Technology & Innovation

Brain activity pattern may be early sign of schizophrenia

In a study that might enable earlier diagnosis, neuroscientists find abnormal brain connections that can predict onset of psychotic episodes.

Image credit: MIT News

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
November 8, 2018

Schizophrenia, a brain disorder that produces hallucinations, delusions, and cognitive impairments, usually strikes during adolescence or young adulthood. While some signs can suggest that a person is at high risk for developing the disorder, there is no way to definitively diagnose it until the first psychotic episode occurs.

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Mind & Brain

The font that can improve your memory

Early reports show that it works, as odd as the approach may seem to some fontologists.

Big Think photoshop
  • A font has been developed with the aim of improving your memory.
  • 57% of respondents were able to remember text written in this font.
  • It's free to download.
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Mind & Brain

What's better for your brain: 15 minutes of jogging or 15 minutes of relaxation?

A new study compared cognitive boosts from running versus relaxing.

Getty Images
  • Researchers compared jogging versus relaxing for 15 minutes.
  • Jogging provided clear cognitive and mood benefits.
  • The relaxing group had much less energy.
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Mind & Brain