New invention promises quantum internet that can't be hacked

Breakthrough technology uses multiplexing entanglement to make an ultra-secure quantum internet.

Credit: Copyright ÖAW/Klaus Pichler
  • Scientists devise the largest-ever quantum communications network.
  • The technology is much cheaper than previous attempts and promises to be hacker-proof.
  • The 'multiplexing' system devised by the researchers splits light particles that carry information.
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New hypothesis argues the universe simulates itself into existence

A physics paper proposes neither you nor the world around you are real.

Credit: Quantum Gravity Institute
  • A new hypothesis says the universe self-simulates itself in a "strange loop".
  • A paper from the Quantum Gravity Research institute proposes there is an underlying panconsciousness.
  • The work looks to unify insight from quantum mechanics with a non-materialistic perspective.
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Breakthrough in creation of gamma ray lasers that use antimatter

Superpowerful lasers for next-generation technologies are closer to existence.

  • A new study calculates how to create high-energy gamma rays.
  • Physicist Allen Mills proposes using liquid helium to make bubbles of positronium, a mixture with antimatter.
  • Gamma ray lasers can lead to new technologies in space propulsion, medical imaging and cancer treatment.
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10 great physics courses you can take online right now, for free

Here are 10 physics courses you can take now with some of the best experts in the world.

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  • You can find numerous physics courses currently available online for free.
  • Courses are taught by instructors with amazing credits like Nobel Prizes and field-defining work.
  • Topics range from introductory to Einstein's theory of relativity, particle physics, dark energy, quantum mechanics, and more.
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Strange quantum effect found in an exotic superconductor

Researchers discovered a mysterious quantum effect that breaks a 60-year-old physics theorem.

Princeton University
  • Princeton scientists lead an international team that discovered unusual behavior in iron-based superconductors.
  • The researchers observed how adding cobalt atoms disrupted superconductivity.
  • The experiment demonstrated unexpected quantum behavior.
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