"Game changer" superconductor discovered to power future computers

Scientists from John Hopkins find a material for quantum computing.

Credit: Yufan Li
  • Researchers from John Hopkins University discovered a new superconducting material.
  • The material, called β-Bi2Pd, can create flex qubits, necessary for quantum computing.
  • Next for the scientists is looking for Majorana fermions.
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Quantum Darwinism, which may explain our reality, passes tests

A mind-bending physics theory may explain why we have one reality instead of many.

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  • Quantum Darwinism, a theory created by Wojciech Zurek, may explain decoherence.
  • The theory looks to reconcile quantum mechanics with classical physics.
  • Three recent studies support the theory.
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Why the number 137 is one of the greatest mysteries in physics

Famous physicists like Richard Feynman think 137 holds the answers to the Universe.

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  • The fine structure constant has mystified scientists since the 1800s.
  • The number 1/137 might hold the clues to the Grand Unified Theory.
  • Relativity, electromagnetism and quantum mechanics are unified by the number.
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Revised Schrödinger's cat experiment challenges reality

A classic experiment gets an update that contradicts key assumptions of quantum mechanics.

  • Physicists revise the Schrödinger's cat thought experiment.
  • The new version leads to contradictions in quantum theory.
  • Scientists are stumped by the implications.
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You thought quantum mechanics was weird: check out entangled time

What if entanglement also occurs across time? Is there such a thing as temporal nonlocality?

 

Photo by Tristan Gassert on Unsplash

In the summer of 1935, the physicists Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger engaged in a rich, multifaceted and sometimes fretful correspondence about the implications of the new theory of quantum mechanics. The focus of their worry was what Schrödinger later dubbed entanglement: the inability to describe two quantum systems or particles independently, after they have interacted.

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