Will COVID-19 kill off flat Earthism once and for all?

One silver lining of the pandemic: The value of common sense, facts and rational decisions increases.

Image: Library of Congress – public domain
  • The recent rise of flat-Earth theory can be explained by a certain social and political atmosphere.
  • The coronavirus crisis may put an end to the flat-Earth model's already waning popularity, which has been trending down since 2017.
  • Some have already argued that the coronavirus will sound the death-knell for populism. Perhaps it will prove the last straw for flat Earthism too.
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ESO astronomers observe exoplanet where it rains molten iron

The ESO finds another exoplanet that's definitely not a place for us to go.

Image source: diversepixel/MrVander/Shutterstock/Big Think
  • WASP-76b is an extremely hot planet whose cooler side has a surface temperature of 1,500° C (2732° F).
  • Iron that evaporates in the heat of the planet's day side rains down in molten form on the night side.
  • ESO learned more about the planet's intense climate thanks to its new ESPRESSO (Echelle Spectrograph for Rocky Exoplanet and Stable Spectroscopic Observations) instrument.
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Physicists probe why the Universe exists and has matter

A new study rocks prevailing theories on antimatter in the early Universe.

NASA
  • Scientists from around the world teamed up to study the properties of neutrons.
  • They were able to achieve extremely precise measurements of electric compasses in neutrons.
  • The results challenge current theories of why antimatter and matter didn't destroy each other in the early Universe.
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'Waterworld' was a documentary? Geologists think Earth could have once been 100% ocean

The Hollywood blockbuster may have been right, if only 3.2 billion years off the mark.

(Photo: Universal Pictures)
  • Researchers find evidence that Earth may have been submerged in a global ocean during the Archaean eon.
  • The research could change our understanding of how life emerged.
  • It's one of many recent studies changing how we view our planet's infancy.
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NASA provides first evidence of “marsquakes”

A new batch of papers reveals some of Mars' subterranean secrets.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
  • The spacecraft InSight detected tremors from deep underneath the rust-colored surface of Mars indicating, for the first time ever, that the planet is geologically active.
  • The quakes could potentially give seismologists insights into the interior composition of the planet.
  • The Insight lander also uncovered magnetized rocks "consistent with a past dynamo with Earth-like strength" under the surface of the landing sight.
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