Is this the world map of the future?

North America and Europe peripheral on China's 'vertical world map'

  • Europe has dominated cartography for so long that its central place on the world map seems normal
  • However, as the economic centre of gravity shifts east and the climate warms up, tomorrow's map may be very different
  • Focusing on both China and Arctic shipping lanes, this vertical representation could be the world map of the future
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Elephants are now being hunted for their skin, being turned into 'ruby'-like jewelry

With the ivory trade on the decline, poachers have been capitalizing on a new, disturbing trend.

Beads made from elephant skin. Image courtest of Elephant Family
  • At the start of 2018, China banned all ivory products within its borders. As one of the largest markets for ivory, this represented a significant win for conservationists.
  • However, just as the ivory trade declined, a new demand for elephant skin emerged.
  • The skin is used in medicine and to make jewelry. What options are there for combating this dangerous new trend?
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Hispanic people experiencing largest homeownership gains in America

At 18 percent of the population, Hispanics account for 67.2 percent of U.S. net homeownership gains.

Photo credit: INTI OCON / AFP / Getty Images
  • After a 50-year low, Hispanics have seen the largest homeownership gains for any ethnic demographic.
  • The uptick likely results from a bevy of gains Hispanics have seen in recent years.
  • This rise in homeownership is part of an increasingly diverse United States.
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Image source: Jason Blackeye
  • Wind turbines in Scotland produced more than 9.8 million megawatt-hours of electricity in the first half of 2019.
  • Scotland is a global leader in renewable energies, generating more than half of its electricity consumption from renewables.
  • The U.S. currently generates about 7 percent of its electricity from wind.
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Major insurer, Chubb Ltd., to cease underwriting construction of new coal-fired power plants

It's the first major insurance company with operations in the U.S. to move away from coal.


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/Contributor
  • Chubb Ltd., which operates in the U.S., plans to no longer underwrite construction of new coal-fired power plants and to stop investing in companies that generate significant revenue from coal.
  • Insurance companies have to cover losses from natural disasters, which are increasing in frequency and intensity as a result of climate change.
  • Climate change could also cause individual insurance premiums to rise significantly.
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