Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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Do you prefer subs or dubs? Here’s a map for that.

Europe is divided on whether films should have subtitles or different audio tracks.

Image: MapChart, reproduced with kind permission
  • The boom of international content is fueling the rise of dubbing, or 're-voicing' the movie or series in another language.
  • As old as the 'talkies', dubbing and subtitling won out over a competing technique known as 'multiple language versions'.
  • As this map shows, Europe is deeply divided between subbing and dubbing – and between different kinds of dubbing.
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This is how you overcome a language barrier

Don't worry about grammar rules at first. They'll only trip you up.

  • Learning a language can be a tricky process, but it's important to remember that it is a process.
  • Having learned 20 languages so far, Canadian polyglot and LingQ founder Steve Kaufmann's advice is to not focus on the grammar. Constantly thinking about the rules while attempting to speak only makes it harder.
  • Investing time (often several months) into listening, reading, and practicing words before trying to speak a language will help you feel more comfortable with it. You will make mistakes, but you will learn from them and people will be patient with you.
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Scientists are studying your Twitter slang to help AI

Mathematicians studied 100 billion tweets to help computer algorithms better understand our colloquial digital communication.

Photo credit: Getty Images
  • A group of mathematicians from the University of Vermont used Twitter to examine how young people intentionally stretch out words in text for digital communication.
  • Analyzing the language in roughly 100 billion tweets generated over eight years, the team developed two measurements to assess patterns in the tweets: balance and stretch.
  • The words people stretch are not arbitrary but rather have patterned distributions such as what part of the word is stretched or how much it stretches out.
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Learn a new language—super fast. Here’s how.

According to a man that knows more than 20 languages, the key is to start in the middle.

  • Canadian polyglot Steve Kaufmann says there is indeed a fast track to learning a new language. It involves doubling down on your listening and reading.
  • By taking the focus off grammar rules that are difficult to understand and even more difficult to remember, you can instead develop habits by greater exposure to the language. Kaufmann likens the learning process to a hockey stick.
  • In the beginning you make major progress as you climb the steep hill of the hockey stick, whereas the long shaft of the stick is the difficult part. Because you're not seeing day-to-day changes, you might lose motivation. So, stay the course by consuming content that interests you.

Board and card games to boost your vocabulary

A larger vocabulary can be a confidence booster for children and make adults better communicators.

Image by Wokandapix from Pixabay
  • There are many benefits to developing one's vocabulary beyond just sounding smarter.
  • A stronger vocabulary can boost confidence, improve comprehension, and make you a better communicator.
  • The entire family can learn and practice new words with these fun games.
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