"What to Expect When You’re Expecting Robots"

New book explores a future populated with robot helpers.

Oli Scarff/Getty Images

As Covid-19 has made it necessary for people to keep their distance from each other, robots are stepping in to fill essential roles, such as sanitizing warehouses and hospitals, ferrying test samples to laboratories, and serving as telemedicine avatars.

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Photo by Martin Adams on Unsplash
She was walking down the forest path with a roll of white cloth in her hands. It was trailing behind her like a long veil.
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AI and robotics are revolutionizing restaurant kitchens—here’s how you can invest

Miso Robotics has already served up over 12,000 hamburgers.

Credit: Courtesy of Miso Robotics
  • Quick service restaurants are facing growing labor, food, and real estate costs.
  • Miso Robotics is working with these restaurants to lower labor costs via automation.
  • Miso Robotics has already produced over 60,000 pounds of food with its revolutionary technology.
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The fastest drummer in the world is a cyborg

An accident left this musician with one arm. Now he is helping create future tech for others with disabilities.

  • Meet the world's first bionic drummer. Rock musician Jason Barnes lost his arm in a terrible accident... and then he became the fastest drummer in the world.
  • With the help of Gil Weinberg, a Georgia Tech professor and inventor of musical robots, the pair utilized electromyography and ultrasound technology to break musical records.
  • Weinberg and Barnes hope to perfect the technology so that it can one day be used to help other people with disabilities realize that "they're not only not disabled, they're actually super-able."
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Catching serial killers with an algorithm

This week, Big Think is partnering with Freethink to bring you amazing stories of the people and technologies that are shaping our future.

  • There are over 250,000 unsolved murder cases in the United States. Thomas Hargrove, cofounder of Murder Accountability Project, wants that number to be as close to zero as possible, and he has just the tool to help.
  • Hargrove developed an algorithm that, through cluster analysis, is capable of finding connections in murder data that human investigators tend to miss.
  • The technology exists, but a considerable roadblock that the project faces is getting support and cooperation from law enforcement offices.
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