5 big predictions for 2021

A deeper appreciation for science and less unnecessary spending could be in our future.

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  • The "Fauci effect" has helped produce a record number of medical school applications.
  • We'll soon no longer be able to avoid the reality of climate change, prompting more decisive action.
  • Work from home trends are likely to continue and, in many cases, become permanent.
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How to have a constructive conversation with vaccine skeptics

Jonathan Berman wants us to have better dialogues.

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  • In his book, "Anti-vaxxers," science educator Jonathan Berman aims to foster better conversations about vaccines.
  • While the anti-vax movement in America has grown, more Americans now say they'll get a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • In this Big Think interview, Berman explains why he's offering an ear to the anti-vax movement.
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New study argues that migrating from cities, not travel bans, slows spread of disease

Of course, it's all about where you move. The authors argue that it needs to be less populous regions.

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  • Moving from densely-populated urban regions is more effective in stopping the spreading of disease than closing borders.
  • Two researchers from Spain and Italy ran 10,000 simulations to discover that travel bans are ultimately ineffective.
  • Smaller cities might suffer high rates of infection, but the nation overall could benefit from this model.
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Denmark to kill 17 million mink to prevent spread of mutated coronavirus

It's a precautionary measure stemming from fears that mutated coronavirus strains may reduce the efficacy of future vaccines.

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  • Danish officials say farm-raised mink have infected 12 people with a mutated strain of coronavirus.
  • Although those people didn't suffer especially serious symptoms, they responded relatively poorly to antibody treatments.
  • Unlike most other animals, mustelids (like mink) are especially susceptible to contracting coronaviruses.
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Do vitamins help you fight COVID-19?

So far, the research is mixed.

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  • A lot of hype surrounds vitamins and minerals for treating or preventing COVID-19, though little evidence exists.
  • Vitamins C and D and zinc may help boost the body's response to the coronavirus, but likely only if you're deficient.
  • Dozens of studies are currently investigating the potential use of these supplements on COVID-19 patients.
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