Plant-grown vaccines: the next step in medicine?

Medicago is growing a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidate in a relative of the tobacco plant right now.

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  • Canadian biotech company Medicago is growing a vaccine candidate in Nicotiana benthamiana.
  • An Australian relative to tobacco, plant-based vaccines could be cheaper and more reliable than current methods.
  • Medicago just completed phase 3 clinical trials of an influenza vaccine, which could be a game-changer for vaccine production.
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One important benefit of quarantine: reduced noise

Noise pollution is terrible for our health, yet we don't discuss it often enough.

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  • Excess noise leads to elevated fatigue, stress, blood pressure elevation, and negative attitudes.
  • Increased levels of noise have been shown to negatively impact our ability to learn.
  • A new study shows that noise levels have dropped significantly during quarantine.
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Typeface matters: Donations go up depending on typeface choice

A study in the hospitality industry shows the importance of design, including during a pandemic.

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  • Ohio State University researchers found that the right type choice drives up donations in the hospitality industry.
  • Warmth-focused versus competence-focused messages were matched with handwritten or machine-written typefaces.
  • This research could help restaurants and hotels make targeted design choices as they struggle to survive.
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Why do some people suffer worse from COVID-19? New studies identify a genetic mutation

94 percent of men in the study have this mutation, which explains why men are more likely to die.

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  • Since the pandemic began, we've wondered why some people suffer terribly while others show no symptoms.
  • A team at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute discovered a genetic mutation responsible for the production of "auto-antibodies."
  • These findings could change treatment protocols and vaccine development moving forward.
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How the sports industry is approaching post-pandemic fan engagement

What does sports fandom look like in the new normal?

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  • With the masses huddled at home and glued to our screens, the last several months of frozen competition provided an opportunity for sports franchises to experiment with creative modes of fan engagement, often involving multiple media channels.
  • On another level, this is a challenge that wasn't prompted by COVID-19 and won't go away when COVID-19 does.
  • Franchise marketers are accelerating their digital transformation processes, finding innovative ways to connect with fans online, with VR, community building and repackaging classic content.
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