The writer's choice of word processor is now better than ever

There's a lot to love about the innovations of Scrivener 3 for the Mac.

  • Most word processors are not suitable for long-form writing projects.
  • Scrivener 3 for Mac addresses specifically what is lacking in its competitors.
  • At an affordable price, Scrivener 3 is the best option on the market for writers.
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Become an expert in cybersecurity with this innovative new bundle

Prep for the most essential cybersecurity exams with over 400 hours of training.

Photo by Bethany Legg on Unsplash
  • Cybersecurity is a lucrative and growing career path in the modern world.
  • In order to understand the field and prove it to employers, it's useful to certify your knowledge.
  • The Complete 2021 CyberSecurity Super Bundle is the best way to fulfill these two needs.
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Get certified in cybersecurity with this expert training guide

Prepare for the four essential certification tests in the field with over 111 hours of training.

  • Cybersecurity is a rising field in modern technology.
  • There are four examinations to pass to verify your qualification for a job in cybersecurity.
  • To pass these examinations, prepare with the CompTIA Security Infrastructure Expert Bundle.
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Scientists test how to deflect asteroids with nuclear blasts

A study looks at how to use nuclear detonations to prevent asteroids from hitting Earth.

Credit: Adobe Stock
  • Researchers studied strategies that could deflect a large asteroid from hitting Earth.
  • They focused on the effect of detonating a nuclear device near an asteroid.
  • Varying the amount and location of the energy released could affect the deflection.
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Ancient computer found in shipwreck decoded by scientists

A new model of the Antikythera mechanism reveals a "creation of genius."

Credit: Antikythera Mechanism Research Project

Today, if you want to know when the next solar eclipse is going to be, you turn to Google. If you lived in ancient Greece, though, you might have used a device now known as the Antikythera mechanism.

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