How we make moral decisions

In some situations, asking "what if everyone did that?" is a common strategy for judging whether an action is right or wrong.

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Imagine that one day you're riding the train and decide to hop the turnstile to avoid paying the fare.
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How does your brain make split second decisions?

Researchers explore the "complex web of connections" in your brain that allows you to make split second decisions.

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  • Researchers at the University of Colorado discovered the cerebellum's role in split-second decision making.
  • While it was previously thought that the cerebellum was in charge of these decisions, it's been uncovered that it is more like a "complex web of connections" through the brain that goes into how you make choices.
  • If the decision is made within 100 milliseconds (of being presented with the choice), the change of mind will succeed in altering the original course of action.
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Psychology's five major perspectives explained

Why do you feel the way you feel, think the way you think and behave the way you do? Here are 5 possible explanations.

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  • Psychology is the scientific study of the mind and behavior, but did you know there are actually 5 different perspectives to psychology?
  • The earliest study of human psychology can be traced back to 400-500 BC.
  • The biological approach, the psychodynamic approach, the behavioral approach, the cognitive approach, and the humanistic approach offer valid yet opposing ideas on why humans behave the way we do.
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Haven’t found your niche? This might be why.

Most people don't know what they're passionate about.

  • A niche, in terms of the economy and what you do for a living, is often considered a special talent or service that speaks to you on a different, secondary level. Adam Davidson, co-founder of NPR's "Planet Money" argues that when a niche finds an audience and becomes a successful business, it evolves into its own primary economy.
  • For most people, finding something you're passionate about can take a long time. The search should happen concurrently with your current job and life, not in place of them.
  • It won't be easy and there will have to be sacrifices, Davidson says. But when it's something that you can't live without doing, then it is worth investing the time and effort.

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Kids today are lacking these psychological nutrients

The key to raising indistractable kids is to first determine why they're distracted.

  • When it comes to the rules and restrictions placed on children, author and Stanford Graduate School of Business lecturer Nir Eyal argues that they have a lot in common with another restricted population in society: prisoners. These restrictions have contributed to a generation that overuses and is distracted by technology.
  • Self-determination theory, a popular theory of human motivation, says that we all need three things for psychological well-being: competence, autonomy, and relatedness. When we are denied these psychological nutrients, the needs displacement hypothesis says that we look for them elsewhere. For kids today, that means more video games and screen time.
  • In order to raise indistractable kids, Eyal says we must first address issues of overscheduling, de-emphasize standardized tests as indicators of competency, and provide them with ample free time so that they can be properly socialized in the real world and not look to technology to fill those voids.

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