How to make a smoother entrance into any room or conversation

Sometimes, the more understated you are, the more positively you'll be received.

  • Knowing how to enter can make or break you, according to business psychologist and advisor Dr. Melanie Katzman.
  • You don't own the room or conversation by dominating it. Instead you're better off asking permission, acting respectful, and taking the time to consider what interests the person with whom you're interacting.
  • Who can you look to as an example? Somewhat surprisingly, professional clowns.
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What Shark Tank investor Daymond John looks for in a business pitch

It takes more than a good idea to land a shark as a business partner.

  • As a successful entrepreneur, investor, and one of the stars of 'Shark Tank,' Daymond John is used to being pitched business ideas. In this interview, he shares what separates bad pitches from great pitches.
  • Beyond the idea, how well (or not) he and potential business partners will work together is a big factor.
  • Proof that the person did their research and some of the legwork before hand also goes a long way.

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Working for Harvey Weinstein was a 'brutal experience'

In 1998, former New Yorker editor Tina Brown went into business with Harvey Weinstein. That was a colossal mistake.

  • Tina Brown was never sexually harassed by Harvey Weinstein, however in 1998, she began a business partnership with Weinstein founding a new magazine following her success rebooting The New Yorker.
  • She describes the experience as a "colossal mistake" and Weinstein as a brutal bully who abused and humiliated his staff and left Brown shell-shocked. The venture was dropped, and Brown's regret is that she didn't pull the plug as soon as she learned what Weinstein was like behind closed doors.
  • Before you get into business with anyone, get to know who they are, advises Brown. Make phone calls to people who have worked with them in the past, and draw a line in the sand so you do not become roped into a bully's world.
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Sexual harassment: Organizations must stop protecting ‘brilliant jerks’

More rules is not what's going to stop sexual harassment at work, says Johnny C. Taylor, Jr. Change the culture.

  • "Too many organizations have tolerated the brilliant jerk. Too many organizations have tolerated the highly profitable sexual harasser or bully," says Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., CEO of the Society for Human Resource Management. At this point in time, more rules is not the answer. The workplace culture must reject harassers.
  • When organizations do nothing to stop harassers and have one set of rules for the powerful and one for the powerless, productivity, workplace culture, and morale are affected in ways we can measure, and in insidious, destructive ways that we cannot.
  • "Think about it, says Taylor. "Your star performer is known to flirt the line, if not cross the line, with respect to inappropriate workplace behavior. Are you prepared to fire that person, even if it means you may lose a major contract? That's when employees will judge who you are and what this company is really about. They're going to judge you on what you do, not what you say."
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Are you superior to others? Or is it an illusion?

When setting the standards and expectations for others, first take responsibility for your own.

  • Most problems for leaders are self-inflicted. It's important for leadership to reflect on the standards and expectations they set for themselves before they set incredibly high standards and expectations for other members of their team.
  • Executive coach and transformation expert Peter Fuda reminds that, for the most part, we judge ourselves by our intentions while we judge others by their actions. Being cognizant of this illusory superiority can help increase compassion and connection within a team.
  • Find out more about Peter's ground-breaking digital platform at enixa.co.
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