Why we need to restrict calories right now

A new study shows the benefits of calorie restriction. Never has such advice been more needed.

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  • A new study based at Salk Institute has discovered the cellular mechanisms behind calorie restriction.
  • Rats on a higher-calorie diet experienced more inflammation and immune problems than rats that ate less.
  • This research is especially relevant right now, as immunodeficient patients are at high risk of complications from COVID-19.
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By 2050, the U.S. Alzheimer's population will double. We're not prepared.

The Alzheimer's Association says its new analysis and surveys "should sound an alarm regarding the future of dementia care in America."

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  • By 2050, the number of Americans over age 65 with Alzheimer's is expected to rise from 5.8 to 13.8 million.
  • A new report from the Alzheimer's Association highlights how the already-stressed U.S. healthcare system is not prepared to meet this surge.
  • There's currently no cure for Alzheimer's, which is a degenerative and potentially deadly form of dementia.

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Another important reason to stay fit: your independence

Increasing numbers of seniors need help with basic tasks. It doesn't have to be that way.

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  • Everyone suffers from sarcopenia: the loss of muscle mass and strength due to age.
  • While there are numerous benefits to exercise, an important one is remaining independent well into old age.
  • Weightlifting is essential for keeping muscle mass and strength as the decades go by.
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Researchers asked older adults about the strategies they use for combatting loneliness. Here's what they said.

"I used to mountain climb… If I can't walk anymore, I'll crawl."

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In an ever-more connected world, it would be easy to assume that loneliness was on its way out — after all, we now have unlimited opportunity to communicate with almost anyone we want at any time we please.

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Age gives you an edge in the workplace. Here’s how.

60 is the new 30, says Melanie Katzman. Embrace your age and the benefits that come with it.

  • Melanie Katzman has 30 years of experience in her field, yet was advised to tell people she had just 20 years of experience so she wouldn't seem too out of touch.
  • Katzman strongly disagrees with that assessment of age in the workplace. Rather than see it as a liability, older professionals should embrace their age and experience. They can see patterns more broadly, plus they have deep network connections, information, and the desire to be generous.
  • "Research shows us that generativity flows downhill," says Katzman. "... New recruits and aging boomers can really change the world together but we have to not be afraid of stating our age."
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