Racial purity is “scientifically meaningless," say 8,000 geneticists

American geneticists take a stand against the misuse of their science by racists.

Milk chugging white supremacists.
  • The largest society of geneticists decries the distortion of ideas by racists.
  • Science does not support the concept of race.
  • Race is a social construct, explain the scientists.
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Why meritocracy is America’s most destructive myth

Meritocracy doesn't work when some people benefit from the system disproportionately.

  • When fighting for social justice, there is a difference between equality and equity.
  • It's not radical to fight for a world where everyone has the same access to education, has food, and is equal in the eyes of the criminal justice system.
  • There is no real meritocracy if some people disproportionately benefit from the system just because of their skin color.
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How experiencing discrimination in VR can make you less biased

What would it be like to live in the body of someone else? With VR, now you can actually find out.

What would it be like to live in the body of someone else? Since the dawn of mankind, people have imagined what it would be like to inhabit another body, just for a day or even for a few minutes. Thanks to the magic of VR, we can now do that. Jeremy Bailenson, the creator of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab, has designed a VR experience called 1000 Cut Journey that may change the way people see race: by experiencing it firsthand. Jeremy explains to us, "You start out as an elementary school child and you’re in a classroom. You then become a teenager and you’re interacting with police officers. You then become an adult who’s going on a job interview, and what you experience while wearing the body of a black male is implicit bias that happens repeatedly and over time." Jeremy is brought to you today by Amway. Amway believes that diversity and inclusion ​are ​essential ​to the ​growth ​and ​prosperity ​of ​today’s ​companies. When woven ​into ​every ​aspect ​of ​the talent ​life ​cycle, companies committed to diversity and inclusion are ​the ​best ​equipped ​to ​innovate, and ​improve ​brand image ​and ​drive ​performance.

How to Outsmart Your Brain's Inbuilt Xenophobia

Evolution has trained your mind to create in-groups and out-groups in a flash—but the lines are more flexible than you think.

Planet of the Apes (1968)

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How the Confederate flags came down at the University of Mississippi

Twenty years ago, it would have been a difficult proposition to ask the University of Mississippi to take down all the confederate flags on campus. But an angry chancellor, a powerful football coach, and a former alumni highly skilled at public relations all played their part to rid the campus of its turbulent historical reminders.

Harold Burson — one of the co-founders of global public relations firm Burson-Marsteller — has a fascinating story about how the confederate flags came down once and for all at his alma mater, the University of Mississippi. It involves an angry chancellor, a powerful football coach, and a young Harold Burson himself as the former alumni who understood the power of compromise. They all played their part to rid the campus of it's turbulent historical reminders, and Ole Miss is much better for it. Harold's latest book is The Business of Persuasion: Harold Burson on Public Relations.