Like it or not, you can't ignore how people look or sound

A new study from Ohio State University details implicit bias.

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  • New research from Ohio State claims we cannot separate how someone looks and sounds.
  • Volunteers were asked to look at photos and listen to audio, and were told to ignore their face or voice.
  • "They were unable to entirely eliminate the irrelevant information," said associate professor Kathryn Campbell-Kibler.
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The trouble with judging historical figures by today’s moral standards

Monuments are under attack in America. How far should we go in re-examining our history?

Photo by PARKER MICHELS-BOYCE/AFP via Getty Images.
  • Historical American monuments and sculptures are under attack by activists.
  • The monuments are accused of celebrating racist history.
  • Toppling monuments is a process that often happens in countries but there's a danger of bias.
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The history of using the Insurrection Act against Americans

Numerous U.S. Presidents invoked the Insurrection Act to to quell race and labor riots.

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  • U.S. Presidents have invoked the Insurrection Act on numerous occasions.
  • The controversial law gives the President some power to bring in troops to police the American people.
  • The Act has been used mainly to restore order following race and labor riots.
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How pandemics are used to promote racism and xenophobia

The current focus on the Chinese and Jews is nothing new.

Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images
  • Pandemics have historically brought out racist and xenophobic tendencies.
  • COVID-19 has sparked conspiracy theories against Chinese and Jewish populations around the world.
  • Racist tropes spread online have real-world consequences that are harming communities.
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Study: Teaching liberals about white privilege reveals 'startling' blind spot

Psychologists looked at how liberals and conservatives react after learning about "white privilege".

West Virginia men. 2018. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
  • Psychologists looked at how liberals and conservatives viewed poor people after learning about "white privilege".
  • Conservatives didn't show much sympathy for poor people regardless of race.
  • Liberals seemed to blame poor white people for their problems.
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