Cambridge scientists create a successful "vaccine" against fake news

A large new study uses an online game to inoculate people against fake news.

  • Researchers from the University of Cambridge use an online game to inoculate people against fake news.
  • The study sample included 15,000 players.
  • The scientists hope to use such tactics to protect whole societies against disinformation.
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5 facts you should know about the world’s refugees

Many governments do not report, or misreport, the numbers of refugees who enter their country.

Conflict, violence, persecution and human rights violations led to a record high of 70.8 million people being displaced by the end of 2018.

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Bernie Sanders' student debt plan bails out the rich

Bernie Sanders reveals an even bigger plan than Elizabeth Warren, but does it go too far?

  • Bernie Sanders has released a plan to forgive all the student debt in the country.
  • It is even larger than the plan Elizabeth Warren put forward two months ago.
  • The plan has drawn criticism for forgiving the debt of both the poor and those well off enough to pay their own debt.
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Two officers fired for not confronting Parkland school shooter

How much bravery can and should we expect from police officers?

Politics & Current Affairs
  • Two more Broward sheriff's deputies have been fired for failing to confront the gunman of the Parkland school shooting.
  • In total, four officers have so far been fired for failing to act.
  • The case raises questions about how much bravery and sacrifice the public can reasonably expect of police officers.
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Why a great education means engaging with controversy

Jonathan Zimmerman explains why teachers should invite, not censor, tough classroom debates.

Sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies
  • During times of war or national crisis in the U.S., school boards and officials are much more wary about allowing teachers and kids to say what they think.
  • If our teachers avoid controversial questions in the classroom, kids won't get the experience they need to know how to engage with difficult questions and with criticism.
  • Jonathan Zimmerman argues that controversial issues should be taught in schools as they naturally arise. Otherwise kids will learn from TV news what politics looks like – which is more often a rant than a healthy debate.
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Codetermination: A way to rebalance the economy?

Codetermination is one of the most interesting ideas you've never heard of.

Pexels/RawPixel.com
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Codetermination is the name for corporate governance systems that place workers on the executive board.
  • It is very popular in Europe but has long lost its popularity in the United States.
  • It offers a variety of benefits, but it would change many aspects of the American economy.
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