Study: Do people trust governments less when ‘fake news’ proves real?

People remember when governments lie to them and it lowers their satisfaction in government officials.

  • A recent study measured how the public's trust in government differs when exposed to rumors, government denials, and subsequent verification of the initial rumors.
  • The study, conducted in China, also examined whether any changes in trust lasted over a three-week period.
  • The results suggest that governments that deem negative information as "fake news" may persuade some people, but over the long term it can cost them in credibility and public satisfaction.
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Live on Thursday: Learn innovation with 3-star Michelin chef Dominique Crenn

Dominique Crenn, the only female chef in America with three Michelin stars, joins Big Think Live this Thursday at 1pm ET.

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Malcolm Gladwell: What if presidents were chosen by lottery?

Join Radiolab's Latif Nasser at 1pm ET today as he chats with Malcolm Gladwell live on Big Think.

Can voters really predict who will be a good leader? Malcolm Gladwell joins Big Think Live to discuss this how lotteries could, in theory, distribute leadership more effectively, from government elections, college admissions, and grant applications.

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Glassdoor lists the highest-rated CEOs during COVID

If you want flexibility, transparency, and decent health policies, it seems like working in tech pays off.

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  • The website Glassdoor has released their rankings of the top CEOs and companies to work for during the pandemic.
  • The rankings were based on a study of reviews placed on their website by employees which mentioned COVID or CEO performance.
  • The study isn't quite definitive, but offers an insight into what employees want during times of crisis.
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Study: Private prisons result in more inmates, longer sentences

The Labour Economics study suggests two potential reasons for the increase: corruption and increased capacity.

Politics & Current Affairs
  • After adopting strict sentencing laws in the '80s and '90s, many states have turned to for-profit prisons to handle growing prison populations.
  • A new study in Labour Economics found that privately-run prisons correlate with a rise in incarceration rates and sentence lengths.
  • While evidence is mixed, private prisons do not appear to improve recidivism or cost less than state-run facilities.
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    Is this the end of the myth of American exceptionalism?

    In his new book, "American Rule," Jared Yates Sexton hopes to overturn a centuries-long myth.

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    Politics & Current Affairs
    • In "American Rule," Jared Yates Sexton wants to eradicate the myth of American exceptionalism.
    • Since its founding, Sexton writes that America has been constructed to protect the wealthy elite.
    • In this interview, the writer suggests that facing up to our tragic history affords us an opportunity to build something new.
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    Jon Stewart: Congress is abandoning veterans exposed to toxic 'burn pits'

    Stewart is supporting a new bill that aims to extend health care and disability benefits to veterans who served alongside burn pits.

    Jon Stewart performs onstage during the 13th annual Stand Up for Heroes to benefit the Bob Woodruff Foundation at The Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden on November 04, 2019 in New York City

    Credit: Bryan Bedder / Getty
    Politics & Current Affairs
    • Thousands of American veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan were exposed to burn pits, which may have caused diseases like asthma and cancer.
    • Burn pits were used as a crude way to dispose of waste, including plastics, body parts, dead animals, and hazardous chemicals.
    • Despite gaps in the research linking exposure to medical conditions, advocates say the benefit of the doubt should go to veterans.
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