Researchers unearth the “Lamborghini” of ancient chariots in Pompeii

The chariot survived ancient eruptions and modern-day looters to become a part of the world heritage site.

This ceremonial chariot, likely a pilentum, has been unearthed in Pompeii, and is the first of its type found in Italy.

(Photo: Archaeological Park of Pompeii)
  • Archeologists recently discovered a first-of-its-kind chariot in Pompeii.
  • The ceremonial chariot is decorated with bronze and tin medallions, while the sides sport bronzesheets and red-and-black paintings.
  • Given looting activity in the area, it's lucky the 2,000-year-old treasure wasn't lost to the world heritage site.
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The best defense against authoritarianism? More educated citizens.

For democracy to prosper in the long term, we need more people to reach higher levels of education.

Credit: slexp880 via Adobe Stock
  • It's difficult to overstate the impact of technology and artificial intelligence. Smart machines are fundamentally reshaping the economy—indeed, society as a whole.
  • Seemingly overnight, they have changed our roles in the workplace, our views of democracy—even our family and personal relationships.
  • In my latest book, I argue that we can—and must—rise to this challenge by developing our capacity for "human work," the work that only humans can do: thinking critically, reasoning ethically, interacting interpersonally, and serving others with empathy.
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Is it time to decriminalize prostitution? Two New York bills answer yes in unique ways

One bill hopes to repeal the crime of selling sex and expand social services; the other would legalize the entire sex trade.

Credit: Chandan Khanna/Getty Images
  • Today in the majority of the United States, it is a crime to sell sex, buy it, or promote its sale.
  • The Sex Trade Survivors Justice & Equality Act would decriminalize prostitution in New York state while maintaining punitive measures against buyers and pimps.
  • Opponents suggest this law would only push the illegal sex trade further underground and seek full decriminalization for everyone involved.
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    Japanese government appoints new "Minister of Loneliness"

    While not the first such minister, the loneliness epidemic in Japan will make this one the hardest working.

    Minister Tetsushi Sakamoto

    Photo by CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP via Getty Images
    Politics & Current Affairs
    • The Japanese government has appointed a Minister of Loneliness to implement policies designed to fight isolation and lower suicide rates.
    • They are the second country, after the U.K., to dedicate a cabinet member to the task.
    • While Japan is famous for how its loneliness epidemic manifests, it isn't alone in having one.
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    Why science denial and science negation are different

    Surprising as it may seem, we are all very good at denial. Negation, however, is a different phenomena.

    Credit: mvdiduk, Rob Atkins via Adobe Stock / Big Think
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    • What makes a person espouse an ideology so intensely as to negate the reality of well-established facts? Perhaps the differences between negation and denial can help us understand.
    • Negation looks to the past, while denial looks to the present and future. We negate a historical fact and we deny the reality in front of us. Negation involves a conscious choice to lie, even if it involves the suffering of millions. Denial is subtler and, surprisingly, we all do it.
    • Climate change conflates both negation and denial. Hopefully, understanding why will spur more into action, as we choose to become heroes of a new anti-denialist narrative.
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    Has political correctness gone too far?

    The debate over whether or not there is a place for political correctness in modern society is not always black and white.

    Videos
    • Political correctness is often seen as a debate between two extremes, but there are nuances in the middle of the spectrum. Is there such a thing as being too PC, and if so, where is that line?
    • While philosopher Slavoj Žižek, comedian Lewis Black, and actor Jeff Garlin acknowledge that some topics can be hurtful or even oppressive and should thus be approached with "good taste and self-restraint," they also argue that PC culture has tipped the scales far beyond being balanced. "If we continue to move in that direction," says Black, "then we're going to be living between uptight and stupid and there'll be no in between."
    • Simultaneously, others—including Paul F. Tompkins, Jim Gaffigan, and Martin Amis—argue that political correctness aims to change things for the better, especially for groups who have been marginalized and discriminated against, and that not being sexist and racist, for example, is not actually a heavy lift. "The fact of the matter is these people are the people of today and you might be a person of yesterday if you can't adjust and you can't be in tune with what people think is funny anymore," says Tompkins.

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