2 reasons why mothers far outnumbered fathers in human history

Surprising studies revealed why mothers affected the genetic pool more than fathers.

Credit: Pixabay
  • Studies showed that in human history, mothers often outnumbered fathers.
  • This happened because of polygyny and migration patterns.
  • Modern ratio of mothers to fathers is closer to 1 to 1.
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Surprising Science
Elderly people are seen near the National Stadium where the debate between the two remaining presidential candidates is taking place in Kyiv, Ukraine on April 19, 2019. (Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
  • For the first time in recorded history, there are more over-65s than under-5s.
  • Aging populations worry economists that certain countries will undergo profound financial stress.
  • Yet the current distribution of resources does not allow for further population explosion.
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Politics & Current Affairs
  • A huge segment of America's population — the Baby Boom generation — is aging and will live longer than any American generation in history.
  • The story we read about in the news? Their drain on social services like Social Security and Medicare.
  • But increased longevity is a cause for celebration, says Ashton Applewhite, not doom and gloom.


Videos

How Tasmanian devils are evolving to fight back against extinction

Devil facial tumor disease, or DFTD, has cut the Tasmanian devil population by 90 percent. Now, some devils have evolved to resist the virulent cancer.

GREG WOOD/AFP/Getty Images
  • Devil facial tumor disease, or DFTD, is a transmissible cancer that Tasmanian devils spread through bites.
  • The cancer is highly infectious and lethal, and the Tasmanian devil population has dropped by 90 percent since it was first discovered.
  • In the short time that we've known about the disease, however, the devils seem to be evolving new defenses that are helping some of them fight back and survive.
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Surprising Science

Where you live in America determines when you’ll die

Two maps show two very different takes on the huge discrepancies in U.S. life expectancy

Image: Titlemax
  • These maps show strong links between location and life expectancy.
  • Hawaiians live longest, Mississippians die earliest.
  • County-level ranking shows short-life hotspots in Kentucky, long-life ones in Colorado.
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Strange Maps