Where citizen science meets the coronavirus—and how you can help

Creators of the popular protein-folding game, Foldit, are seeking help to design a treatment for COVID-19.

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  • Since being founded in 2008, the crowdsourced protein-folding game, Foldit, has helped solve many novel problems.
  • In recent months, the Foldit team has presented its community with problems relating to COVID-19.
  • Foldit founder, David Baker, says over 20,000 different designs for potential COVID-19 antiviral proteins have been submitted.
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How various levels of social distancing can decrease the spread of COVID-19

Understanding the math behind social distancing.

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  • Proper social distancing includes staying 6ft (2m) away from other people, avoiding all non-essential gatherings or crowds, and working from home if possible.
  • During the COVID-19 incubation period of 5 days, each infected person can infect 2.5 more people.
  • Using this math, it's easy to determine how many people will go on to be infected after the initial person contracted COVID-19 using various levels of social distancing (0%, 50% and 75% examples are found in this article).
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Urine survey reveals Europe’s favorite drugs

Coke, meth, ecstasy, amphetamines: each drug has a different 'capital'

  • A large-scale survey of wastewater across Europe shows which illicit drugs are popular.
  • The use of four main drugs was up across the board last year, but regional variation persists.
  • Cocaine is popular in the west and south, meth in the east and north.
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Attempting to track COVID-19 with smart rings for responders

Medical researchers put a ring on it to learn more about the onset of COVID-19.

Oura
  • Smart rings are being tested on San Francisco ER workers to track symptoms of COVID-19.
  • The rings, designed by a company called Oura, detect heart rate, temperature, and respiration.
  • The researchers hope to build a diagnostic algorithm from the collected data.
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    Why we need to restrict calories right now

    A new study shows the benefits of calorie restriction. Never has such advice been more needed.

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    • A new study based at Salk Institute has discovered the cellular mechanisms behind calorie restriction.
    • Rats on a higher-calorie diet experienced more inflammation and immune problems than rats that ate less.
    • This research is especially relevant right now, as immunodeficient patients are at high risk of complications from COVID-19.
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