Could flickering lights fight Alzheimer's? Early research looks promising

An early feasibility study finds a potential new treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

Photo by N Kamalov on Unsplash

For the past few years, Annabelle Singer and her collaborators have been using flickering lights and sound to treat mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, and they've seen some dramatic results.

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Ketamine infusion: The new therapy for depression, explained

The treatment is here, but are we ready?

Credit: COLE BURSTON via Getty Images
  • Ketamine is the first hallucinogen approved for therapeutic use in the U.S.
  • Research has shown ketamine is effective at treating depression.
  • Though ketamine infusion therapy is now being offered at hundreds of North American clinics, there are unaddressed dangers in the current ketamine gold rush.
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Single dose of psilocybin may treat migraines

Can the main psychoactive ingredient of magic mushrooms help treat the world's sixth most debilitating illness?

  • Migraines afflict more than ten percent of the U.S. population, yet treatments are often unreliable and there is no cure.
  • The new study involves giving migraine sufferers a placebo and, two weeks later, a single dose of pure synthetic psilocybin.
  • The results showed that participants reported significantly fewer migraines in the two weeks after the study.
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Pink placebo: Fake energy drink makes people run faster, further

Who needs steroids when you have the placebo effect?

Credit: Philip Strong/Unsplash
  • A study suggests that the effectiveness of sports drinks may depend in part on their color.
  • Runners who rinsed with a pink liquid ran better than those who consumed the same but colorless drink.
  • Improvement in their performance is likely due to a placebo effect.
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Why professional soccer players choke during penalty kicks

A new study used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to measure brain activity as inexperienced and experienced soccer players took penalty kicks.

Abbie Parr via Getty Images
  • The new study is the first to use in-the-field imaging technology to measure brain activity as people delivered penalty kicks.
  • Participants were asked to kick a total of 15 penalty shots under three different scenarios, each designed to be increasingly stressful.
  • Kickers who missed shots showed higher activity in brain areas that were irrelevant to kicking a soccer ball, suggesting they were overthinking.
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