Study reveals alarming link between binge-drinking and anxiety

New research conducted on mice suggests repeated heavy drinking causes synaptic dysfunctions that lead to anxiety.

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  • The study was conducted on mice, who were given the equivalent of five drinks daily for 10 days.
  • Images of the alcoholic mice brains showed synaptic dysfunctions related to microglia (immune cells in the brain).
  • The results suggest that regulating TNF, a signaling protein related to systemic inflammation, may someday play a part in treating alcohol addiction.
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A key COVID-19 immune response in children has been identified

This could change how researchers approach vaccine development.

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  • The reason children suffer less from the novel coronavirus has remained mysterious.
  • Researchers identified a cytokine, IL-17A, which appears to protect children from the ravages of COVID-19.
  • This cytokine response could change how researchers approach vaccine development.
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Study calls out the genes that make cancer cells so hard to kill

Researchers from the University of Toronto published a new map of cancer cells' genetic defenses against treatment.

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  • Developing immunotherapies for cancers is made more difficult by how different tumors are from each other.
  • Some cancers are actually made worse by immunotherapy.
  • A piece falls into place on the complicated puzzle of genetic interactions of cancer cells.
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    Ever wonder how LSD works? An answer has been discovered.

    UNC School of Medicine researchers identified the amino acid responsible for the trip.

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    • Researchers at UNC's School of Medicine have discovered the protein responsible for LSD's psychedelic effects.
    • A single amino acid—part of the protein, Gαq—activates the mind-bending experience.
    • The researchers hope this identification helps shape depression treatment.
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    Measuring brain waves during sleep could lead to better depression treatments

    A team at the University of Basel discovered a connection between antidepressants and REM sleep.

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    • Researchers at the University of Basel measured the efficacy of antidepressants by measuring brain waves during REM sleep.
    • Antidepressants take weeks to begin working, and over 50 percent of users don't find success with the first prescription.
    • This research could offer a powerful new diagnostic tool for psychiatrists and doctors.
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