Stimulating this part of the brain causes ‘uncontrollable urge to laugh’

Interestingly, electrically stimulating the cingulum bundle also seems to reduce anxiety.

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  • In a study of epilepsy patients undergoing electrical stimulation brain mapping, scientists discovered that the stimulation of the cingulum bundle reliably produced laughter, smiles and calm feelings.
  • The findings could someday help scientists develop better treatments for anxiety, depression and chronic pain.
  • One obstacle preventing this kind of treatment from becoming accessible is that it requires invasive surgery, though improved technology could someday change that.
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Microdoses of LSD change how you perceive time

A study on the effects of LSD microdosing shows some fittingly strange results.

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  • A new study offers some of the first evidence that microdosing – taking tiny, regular doses of LSD – does have measurable effects.
  • Subjects taking LSD were less accurate when estimating how long an image appeared on a screen than subjects who were sober.
  • The mechanism that causes this effect remains unknown, but several ideas have been put forward.
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3 of the most speculative benefits of the keto diet

Can the keto diet really help people combat acne, cancer and "brain fog"?

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  • The keto diet is generally an effective method for weight loss.
  • Still, many of the diet's other supposed health benefits aren't as well supported by the research.
  • Claims that the keto diet can help with acne, cancer and mental clarity are speculative, but there's reason to suggest they're worth investigating.
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Researchers fear 400 scientific studies used organs illegally harvested from Chinese prisoners

If a scientific study was conducted unethically, should publishers retract it?

Up to three hundred supporters of the practice of Falun Dafa march through the city center of Vienna, Austria on October 1, 2018 to protest against the importing of human organs from China to Austria. (Photo by JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)
  • A new study suggests hundreds of published scientific papers involving organ transplants in China violated ethical standards.
  • International professional standards say studies involving organ transplants shouldn't be published if the organs came from executed prisoners, or donors don't provide consent.
  • China has long been accused of facilitating a shady network of organ harvesting and trafficking, though it's been difficult to prove.
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The future of male contraceptives? A layered cocktail.

"Dinner and drinks" may take on a new, more provocative meaning.

Photo credit: Keystone / Hulton Archive / Getty Images
  • Scientist propose a layered cocktail as a future male contraceptive.
  • Chemical layers block the flow of sperm and can be dissolved with near-infrared light.
  • Tiny umbrella not included.
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