Can we resurrect the dead? Researchers catalogue potential future methods

From cryonics to time travel, here are some of the (highly speculative) methods that might someday be used to bring people back to life.

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  • Alexey Turchin and Maxim Chernyakov, researchers belonging to the transhumanism movement, wrote a paper outlining the main ways technology might someday make resurrection possible.
  • The methods are highly speculative, ranging from cryonics to digital reconstruction of individual personalities.
  • Surveys suggest most people would not choose to live forever if given the option.
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Why great thinkers balance optimism and pessimism

Leaning too far in either direction is a recipe for stagnation and perhaps even failure.

  • When it comes to thinking about the future, is it best to assume the best or the worst? Like with most things, it's actually a little column A and a little column B. This video features theoretical physicists, futurists, sociologists, and mavericks explaining the pros and cons of both.
  • "In the long term optimists decide the future," argues Kevin Kelly, Senior Maverick for Wired and the magazine's founding executive editor. "It's the optimist who create all of the things that are going to be most important in our life." Kelly adds that, while every car runs on an optimistic engine, "you certainly need breaks to steer it."
  • Finding a balance between the optimism that fuels innovation and a grounded pessimism is the key to a better future.

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Harvard study suggests avoiding TV and daytime naps to avoid depression

The goal of this large-scale study was to provide actionable information on how to avoid depression or decrease depressive symptoms.

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  • Depression is a very common mental disorder, with more than 264 million people struggling with this issue worldwide. According to WHO, depression is a leading cause of disability.
  • Depression results from a complex interaction of social, psychological, and biological factors.
  • A new large-scale Harvard Medical School study suggests daytime napping and frequent television-watching may be negatively contributing to depression.
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What is counterfactual thinking?

Can thinking about the past really help us create a better present and future?

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  • There are two types of counterfactual thinking: upward and downward.
  • Both upward and downward counterfactual thinking can be positive impacts on your current outlook - however, upward counterfactual thinking has been linked with depression.
  • While counterfactual thinking is a very normal and natural process, experts suggest the best course is to focus on the present and future and allow counterfactual thinking to act as a motivator when possible.
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Midlife crisis? More like midlife calling. Here's how to find yours.

Did you know that shifting to a positive perspective on aging can add 7.5 years to your life? Or that there is a provable U-curve of happiness that shows people get happier after age 50?

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