America’s education system is centuries old. Can we build something better?

The Lumina Foundation lays out steps for increasing access to quality post-secondary education credentials.

  • America's post-high school education landscape was not created with the modern student in mind. Today, clear and flexible pathways are necessary to help individuals access education that can help them lead a better life.
  • Elizabeth Garlow explains the Lumina Foundation's strategy to create a post-secondary education system that works for all students. This includes credential recognition, affordability, a more competency-based system, and quality assurance.
  • Systemic historic factors have contributed to inequality in the education system. Lumina aims to close those gaps in educational attainment.
  • In 2019, Lumina Foundation and Big Think teamed up to create the Lumina Prize, a search to find the most innovative and scalable ideas in post-secondary education. You can see the winners of the Lumina Prize here – congratulations to PeerForward and Greater Commons!

Biohacking: Why I'll live to be 180 years old

From computer hacking to biohacking, Dave Asprey has embarked on a quest to reverse the aging process.

  • As a teenager, founder of Bulletproof, Dave Asprey, began experiencing health issues that typically plague older adults.
  • After surrounding himself with anti-aging researchers and scientists, he discovered the tools of biohacking could dramatically change his life and improve his health.
  • He's now confident he'll live to at least 180 years old. "It turns out that those tools that make older people young make younger people kick ass," he says.
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Getting 16.4 million people better post-secondary education? Lumina Foundation has a plan for that.

Lumina Foundation wants to help 16.4 million people get a quality credential by 2025, and they're looking for entrepreneurs with the vision to help realize that goal.

  • Lumina Foundation's goal is to help people across the U.S. get a quality post-secondary education.
  • To do that, it's providing grants, helping to shape policy, and it's investing in innovative entrepreneurs through the Lumina Impact Ventures program.
  • Lumina is looking to partner with entrepreneurs who are dedicated to helping students gain a fulfilling post-secondary education and for whom Lumina Foundation can be a strong value-add partner.
  • In 2019, Lumina Foundation and Big Think teamed up to create the Lumina Prize, a search to find the most innovative and scalable ideas in post-secondary education. You can see the winners of the Lumina Prize here – congratulations to PeerForward and Greater Commons!
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College education is still a class luxury in America. PeerForward is changing that.

Like it or not, most jobs still require some kind of secondary degree. PeerForward is working with low-income communities to ensure that students aren't excluded based on their zip code.

  • More than two-thirds of American jobs require some kind of secondary education. Unfortunately, kids growing up in a low-income area simply do not have the same resources as wealthier areas when it comes to applying for college or making it to graduation.
  • PeerForward works with students in low-income areas to get them into college by helping them identify their target college, find and apply for financial aid, and consider how their choice of major connects to their future career.
  • PeerForward now is expanding onto college campuses to help students persist to earning a degree. The organization hopes to reach 10,000 college students by 2024.
  • PeerForward is a winner of the Lumina Prize. Discover what they're about here.
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How to study better and avoid a test-day disaster

Want to learn better? Here's a lesson from cognitive psychology.

  • Getting hints makes students feel like they're learning, but a cognitive psychology study on monkeys, specifically on two rhesus macaques called Oberon and MacDuff, has proven that getting hints backfires when it comes to test day.
  • If you're relying on outside help, you're not employing what's called the 'generation effect'. The generation effect refers to the mental effort of generating an answer, which actually primes your brain for learning.
  • How can you study better? Test yourself before you're ready, and know that learning is supposed to be frustrating and difficult. If if feels too easy, it might be a sign you're not generating independent answers.
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