Good leaders don’t give advice — they coach

Stop prescribing advice and start helping people come up with their own solutions.

All managers want to see their employees thrive, but it can be tricky to maintain a balance between guiding and hand-holding.

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Personal Growth

Self-command: Learn this powerful thinking tool

When should you censor yourself, and when should you speak up? Emily Chamlee-Wright explains moral philosopher Adam Smith's 'impartial spectator'.

  • 18th-century moral philosopher Adam Smith argued that you could measure the appropriateness of your words and actions by satisfying an imaginary judge he called the impartial spectator.
  • Switching perspectives to listen to that impartial spectator is a difficult skill as it requires self-command to triumph over self-love. Wise people imagine the spectator's response and use it to help steer productive discourse – especially in difficult and chaotic debates.
  • Self-command is an intellectual virtue. It's a thinking tool that helps us know when to self-censor and when to speak up in the interest of civil discourse and truth seeking.
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Sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies

How junior high school kills scientific curiosity

Rote memorization doesn't cut it for theoretical physicist Michio Kaku. Here's why.

  • What is the greatest destroyer of young scientists? Junior high school, avers physicist Michio Kaku.
  • Why? Because it's during this time when science is reduced to memorization of things that are "totally irrelevant," such as the parts of a flower.
  • Kaku believes all this memorizing detracts from the moving force of science, which is discussing principles and concepts.
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Videos

Inequality is unlikely to be overcome by studying hard

A sobering look at the prospects for kids not wealthy enough to fail upward.

Photo credit: Brad Neathery on Unsplash
  • A study by Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce demonstrates how much easier it is for upper-class children to attain successful adulthoods.
  • Test scores tend to drop for even the smartest kids from the lower economic percentiles.
  • By following kids through their education with support, the odds can be evened-out.
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Politics & Current Affairs

In the future, will we acquire skills, not degrees?

Nontraditional education options are on the rise.

Pexels
  • U.S. college enrollment has declined for the eighth consecutive year.
  • Recent survey found that a majority of freelancers found skills training to be more important than having a degree.
  • It's becoming harder for universities to keep up with a rapidly changing workforce.
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Personal Growth