For under $40, ZapReader can get you reading up to three times faster

Improve your reading speed and comprehension with proven tactics gathered from experts in the field.

  • ZapReader uses expert guidance to boost reading speed by up to three times.
  • The ZapReader system helps eliminate bad reading habits set in childhood.
  • A lifetime of ZapReader access is now more than 90% off.
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How to keep your audience engaged

Tips on telling human stories that audiences want to hear from start to finish.

  • The most important part of being a writer is feeling that you're not important and that the work you're doing is not about you.
  • "A journalist is someone who is willing to disappoint themselves with the truth."
  • Every piece of journalism has a narrative arc, and that arc is integral to any human storytelling.
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​The '85% Rule': Why a dose of failure optimizes learning

If you're always succeeding, you're probably not learning much.

Photo by Minas Panagiotakis/Getty Images
  • A recent study examined the rates at which machine-learning algorithms learned to recognize images of tumors.
  • The results showed that learning was optimized when the algorithms guessed incorrectly about 15 percent of the time.
  • The researchers suggested that their findings apply to human and animal learning, too.
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William Shatner: Empathy must be taught

What a group of orphaned elephants can teach us about emotion and learned social skills.

  • Empathy is defined as the act of recognizing, understanding, and being sensitive to the feelings and experiences of others.
  • Sharing a story about young elephants at a nature preserve, William Shatner argues that empathy is a learned skill, not an inherited trait.
  • "That has to be learned, and I don't think it's any different from a boy to a girl. You have to walk in the shoes to experience what the other person is experiencing."
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Hive mind: The good, the bad, and the viral

What is the hive mind? Turns out there are antisocial and prosocial dimensions to it.

  • The hive mind is a shared intelligence or consciousness between groups of people. It determines what we think is culturally acceptable, what we think is fashionable, and even what we think is true. We source most of our information and beliefs from other people and not from ourselves, says psychology professor Sarah Rose Cavanagh.
  • The hive mind often comes under fire in the U.S. because it is a highly individualistic culture that frowns upon things like mindless conformity, echo chambers, and group think. Those are the antisocial aspects of collective thinking.
  • There are also prosocial features, explains Cavanagh. The hive mind allows us to draw on collective knowledge in positive ways, without needing to reinvent the wheel each time.
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