How gratitude makes you more attractive

Social interactions are important for building the strongest relationships.

  • When someone says thank you, who is it for? According to Dr. Sara Algoe, expressions of gratitude have a positive effect on the person receiving the message, the person delivering it, and even those who witness the exchange. These types of social interactions are crucial for building lasting relationships with romantic partners, friends, and coworkers.
  • "When we say 'thank you,' we're sending a message to the person who just did something nice for us, that they are valued, that they're seen, that the thing that they did for us was worth doing in the first place," Algoe says.
  • Expressing gratitude is easy, and the research shows that the benefits far outweigh the effort.

How to get materialism under control in your life

It's insidious and destructive, but there are some things you can do to develop a healthier relationship with material things.

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  • Materialism is a personal focus on acquiring possessions that can steer your attention and behavior away from things that make you happy.
  • There are several things you can do to tame materialism in your own life.
  • Satisfaction ultimately can't be found in collecting the most stuff possible, but rather in achieving intrinsic values.
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    Higher incomes tied to better emotional states — but there's a catch

    A study of 1.6 million people ties high incomes with more positive emotions and fewer negative ones, but only towards the self.

    Credit: Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels
    • A review of data from 1.6 million people shows that higher incomes relate to more positive feelings about the self.
    • Feelings towards others were not affected by higher incomes.
    • The findings have implications for those hoping to improve society by raising incomes alone.
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    The lost art of rest: How to relax

    In her book The Art of Rest, one researcher conducted a thorough analysis of the top 10 activities we find most restful.

    Photo by MARIA E. MAYOBRE on Unsplash

    Even though our bodies and minds are begging for a break, modern culture has turned rest into a sin. So how can we catch a breath?

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    Money impacts happiness more than previously thought, study finds

    A new study casts doubt on previous research showing that emotional well-being plateaus at an income of $75,000 per year.

    Credit: Alexander Mils on Unsplash
    • A new study examined how income affects experienced and evaluative well-being, which are two measures researchers commonly use to evaluate happiness.
    • The results showed that both evaluative and experienced well-being tend to increase alongside income.
    • Still, the results don't suggest you should assign more importance to money, or tie your ideas of personal success to it.
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