Having a purpose in life can affect how long you live

New research shows that aimlessness can be fatal.

Photo by Clark Young on Unsplash
  • New research examined the association between life purpose and mortality and found that individuals who felt they had no purpose in life tended to die earlier.
  • Study participants with low life purpose scores typically died from cardiovascular and digestive tract conditions.
  • The researchers speculate that this could be due to elevated and chronic inflammation caused by a low sense of psychological well-being.
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Personal Growth

What if you could take a psychedelic drug regularly in such tiny quantities that the immediate effects were not discernible, yet over time it led to a range of psychological benefits, especially enhanced focus and heightened creativity?

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Mind & Brain

Coming out trans: How social narratives can stop us from being happy

Many of us don't fit perfectly into existing social narratives. But we can still find our own way.

  • Many of us are trying to fit into existing roles that aren't specially crafted for us, and, as a result, we don't fit perfectly in them. This causes us a lot of stress and anxiety.
  • Though many people aren't transgender, they can still relate to the feeling of not completely fitting in, and having to figure out their own path. Often finding out own way directly overlaps with figuring out what makes us happy.
  • When someone is trans, it is possible for them to feel attracted to either gender. For example, Breanna wishes she could tell her teenage self that it is possible to "be a girl and like girls."


Videos

Work hard, become successful, then you'll be happy. At least, that's what many of us were taught by our parents, teachers and peers.

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Personal Growth

Perfectionism is on the rise – and we're all paying the cost

New research shows elevated risks of anxiety, depression, and suicide linked to perfectionism.

Photo by Taylor Ballantyne /Sports Illustrated/Getty Images
  • A study of 41,641 college students shows that perfectionism is increasing year after year.
  • Along with perfectionist tendencies, researchers noted a symmetrical rise in anxiety, depression, and suicide.
  • The study looks not at parental influence, but at neoliberal policies that have fostered a cult of individualism.
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Personal Growth