This programmable fiber has memories and can sense temperature

Researchers were even able store and read a 767-kilobit full-color short movie file in the fabric.

Image: Anna Gitelson-Kahn. Photo by Roni Cnaani.

MIT researchers have created the first fiber with digital capabilities, able to sense, store, analyze, and infer activity after being sewn into a shirt.

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The Mars helicopter's scary sixth mission

The helicopter's sixth mission almost went down in disaster.

Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech
  • The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was out on a photo-taking mission when it started to act strangely.
  • It kept changing its speed and tipping back and forth.
  • A single error threw its entire navigation system into confusion.
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This map is alive with the beauty of lighthouse signals

The unique light signatures of nautical beacons translate into hypnotic cartography.

Credit: Geodienst – Lights at Sea
  • Many of the world's 23,000 lighthouses feature a distinct combination of color, frequency, and range.
  • These unique light signatures help ships verify their positions and safeguard maritime traffic.
  • But they also translate into this map, visualizing the ingenuity and courage of lighthouse builders and keepers.

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Sorry, the EmDrive doesn’t work

The EmDrive turns out to be the "um..." drive after all, as a new study dubs any previous encouraging EmDrive results "false positives."

Credit: AndSus/zolotons/Adobe Stock/Big Think
  • The proposed EmDrive captured the public's imagination with the promise of super-fast space travel that broke the laws of physics.
  • Some researchers have detected thrusts from the EmDrive that seemed to prove its validity as a technology.
  • A new, authoritative study says, no, those results were just "false positives."
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Cornell creates the world’s tiniest self-folding origami bird

The bird demonstrates cutting-edge technology for devising self-folding nanoscale robots.

Credit: Cornell University
  • Scientists at Cornell University have developed a self-folding origami bird that's just 60 microns wide.
  • The bird is just one of many tiny robots roaming Cornell's labs.
  • One day, microscopic robots will be able to autonomously form themselves and get to work in all sort of itty-bitty spaces.
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