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  • A little-known correspondence between Einstein and Freud reveals his thoughts on war.
  • In this letter, Einstein puts forth the idea for a world government run by an intellectual elite.
  • His goal in this letter was to get Freud's insight into the psychologial matter of violence and how to solve it.
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Culture & Religion

What Einstein meant by ‘God does not play dice’

Einstein's God is infinitely superior but impersonal and intangible, subtle but not malicious. He is also firmly determinist.

A boy looks at a wall showing a graffiti painting of Albert Einstein in Tunis, on July 11, 2010. AFP PHOTO / FETHI BELAID/Getty Images

'The theory produces a good deal but hardly brings us closer to the secret of the Old One,' wrote Albert Einstein in December 1926. 'I am at all events convinced that He does not play dice.'

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Surprising Science

New controversial theory: Past, present, future exist simultaneously

Our experience of time may be blinding us to its true nature, say scientists.

Back to the Future.
  • Time may not be passing at all, says the Block Universe Theory.
  • Time travel may be possible.
  • Your perception of time is likely relative to you and limited.
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Surprising Science

Amazing astronomy: How neutron stars create ripples in space-time

What can cause a ripple in both space and time? Neutron stars colliding. And what can observe that phenomenon? A two-mile-long laser.

Michell Thaller, the Assistant Director of Science Communication at NASA, wanted to talk to us about a heavy subject matter. Specifically, super-dense neutron stars that are so dense that they're only the size of New York City but carry the weight of the sun. And when they circle each other in orbit for long enough, they collide with enough force to send ripples in both space and time. Those ripples alone are strong enough to alter the course of light. In fact, just a few years ago a rare astronomical event occurred where you'd have seen a star "blink" for a few minutes on and off before disappearing for good. Scientists are able to detect these gravitational ripples thanks to a LIGO, or a Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory, which measures the refraction of light based on gravity waves. Oh, and one more thing: Albert Einstein correctly deduced that this phenomenon years before it was ever recorded. If you'd like to know more, visit NASA.

Surprising Science

Could an updated Feynman experiment finally lead to a Theory of Everything?

Measuring quantum gravity has proven extremely challenging, stymying some of the greatest minds in physics for generations.

Illustration of gravitational waves being created by two black holes merging. Credit: NASA.

For over a century, the two leading theories in physics have had irreconcilable differences, and scientists have scrambled to find ways to square them, to no avail. An experiment proposed in 1957 by American luminary Richard Feynman, is now getting a makeover, and the results could be significant.

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Technology & Innovation