Dogs take shortcuts based on Earth’s magnetic fields

New research sees dogs checking a North-South axis on their way home.

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  • As dogs navigate, they appear to be using the Earth's magnetic fields.
  • 170 dogs orient themselves to north and south as they plot shortcuts back to their people.
  • Dogs join the growing number of magnetism-sensitive animals.

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Want to feel better? Science says to care for your dog

Admit it, caring for your pet can make you happy too. Science is working on why.

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  • A study shows that caring for your pets can improve your well-being.
  • The researchers found the act of caring provided more improvements than mere companionship.
  • These results aren't limited to pets. Plenty of studies show caring for others can improve your well-being.
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7 DIY test kits that can reveal hidden info about you, your pet, and your home

Learn where your ancestors are from, the breed of your rescue dog, and if your home is safe with these easy at-home kits.

Photo by Dimitri Bong on Unsplash
  • There is a lot we can learn from the saliva in our mouths and the air in our homes.
  • There are at-home DIY tests for just about everything, but not all of them are as accurate as they claim.
  • From revealing the breed of your dog to testing your home for harmful gases, these kits are worth the money.
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Researchers have identified an area of the dog brain dedicated to processing human faces

The dogs' ability to recognise and process human faces surpasses even that of monkeys. This newly-identified brain region may be the reason why.

If you want to know about the special relationship between human and canine you need only watch a dog owner slavishly feed, cuddle and clean up after her furry companion, day after day after day. But is this unique cross-species relationship also reflected at a deeper level, in the workings of the canine brain? A recent study in Learning and Behavior suggests so, finding that highly trained dogs have a dedicated neural area for processing human faces, separate from the area involved in processing the faces of other dogs.

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Dogs help humans with disabilities socialize with others, researchers find

Having a dog may be one way to curb lonelieness.

Photo credit: JULIAN STRATENSCHULTE/AFP/Getty Images
  • A pilot study has found that dogs help socialize those with intellectual disabilities at Australian group homes.
  • Previous research finds that pets helps those who use wheelchairs "feel more secure and confident in public."
  • People are far more likely to interact with someone with an intellectual disability if they were walking with a dog.
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