Why the capitalist market model destroys the safeguards of some professions

The neoliberal call for more 'choice', seems hard to resist.

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The young doctor was desperate. 'I need to talk to my patients,' she said, 'and give them time to ask questions."
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Growth is killing us: An interview with Jason Hickel

The British economic anthropologist Jason Hickel proposes "degrowth" in the face of recession.

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What would happen if we waved goodbye to capitalism and instead focused on nurturing trust? The British economic anthropologist Jason Hickel tells Paulina Wilk that a better world is possible – but we only have 20 years to build it.

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Should scientific studies be available for free?

Plan S is starting to take hold, but the cost is merely shifting even more to the researchers.

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  • Launched in 2018, cOAlition S is trying to make all of the world's state-backed scientific papers open-access.
  • Prestigious publishers like Springer Nature and Elsevier have now adopted a Plan S option for researchers.
  • While more studies will be available to read for free, some of the expense is being passed back to authors, which could limit research in the future.
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The neoliberal era is ending. What comes next?

The next era in American history can look entirely different. It's up to us to choose.

  • The timeline of America post-WWII can be divided into two eras, according to author and law professor Ganesh Sitaraman: the liberal era which ran through the 1970s, and the current neoliberal era which began in the early 1980s. The latter promised a "more free society," but what we got instead was more inequality, less opportunity, and greater market consolidation.
  • "We've lived through a neoliberal era for the last 40 years, and that era is coming to an end," Sitaraman says, adding that the ideas and policies that defined the period are being challenged on various levels.
  • What comes next depends on if we take a proactive and democratic approach to shaping the economy, or if we simply react to and "deal with" market outcomes.

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Why Amartya Sen remains the century’s great critic of capitalism

Societies aren't just engines of prosperity.

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Critiques of capitalism come in two varieties. First, there is the moral or spiritual critique.
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