What are municipal utilities and why are they suddenly popular?

Can changing who delivers your electricity to you solve a slew of problems?

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  • Cities and movements across the country are considering running their own electric utilities.
  • These operations, known as municipal utilities, are already widespread and have a respectable track record.
  • Representatives of the campaigns to implement municipal control see this as a path to a green, democratic future.
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Want to improve your office? Stop being so bossy.

A variety of structures exist to both treat employees with more respect and increase productivity.

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  • People love freedom but spend most of their day in a place where they are devoid of power, at work.
  • There are a variety of ways to organize an enterprise that give workers influence over the workplace.
  • Studies have found time and again that giving workers dignity, influence, and decent conditions pays off.
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How to build a fairer gig economy in 4 steps

Gig workers suffer from low pay, wage theft, precariousness, dangerous working conditions, and discrimination.

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You've probably heard at least two things about the gig economy.

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The largest private coal company in America just went broke

It's telling about attempts to save the industry.

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  • Murray Energy, the largest private coal company in the U.S., has filed for bankruptcy protection.
  • It is just one of several similar companies to seek these protections this year.
  • Its decline has been years in the making, and is another sign that the market has decided coal's fate.
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We have the tools and technology to work less and live better

We can produce more stuff with less labor. So why are we still working?

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In 1930, a year into the Great Depression, John Maynard Keynes sat down to write about the economic possibilities of his grandchildren.

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