New blood test accurately predicts when people will die — within 5–10 years

The large-scale study got it right for 83 percent of participants. Would you take the blood test?

Photo credit: Miguel Bruna on Unsplash
  • A research team found 14 biomarkers can accurately predict death within 5–10 years.
  • Such a test could help doctors and researchers prescribe better courses of treatments for patients.
  • Information about mortality might inspire people to eat better and exercise more, thus reversing the effects of some biomarkers.
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A new study shows it's never too late to begin strength building

Exercise newbies in their seventies and eighties build muscle at the same rate as master athletes.

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  • Researchers at the University of Birmingham compared master athletes in their seventies and eighties with non-exercising seniors.
  • Regardless of previous conditioning levels, the seniors' ability to create new muscle is the same.
  • This inspiring news is an important reminder that fitness gains are possible at any age.
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Why Australian men live the longest in the world

A new study challenges international life expectancies.

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  • A new method for calculating life expectancies shows that Australian men live the longest.
  • Among women, the Swiss have the longest life spans.
  • The new research takes into account historical mortality conditions.
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Is life after 75 worth living? This UPenn scholar doubts it.

What makes a life worth living as you grow older?

  • Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel revisits his essay on wanting to die at 75 years old.
  • The doctor believes that an old life filled with disability and lessened activity isn't worth living.
  • Activists believe his argument stinks of ageism, while advances in biohacking could render his point moot.
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Biohacking: Why I'll live to be 180 years old

From computer hacking to biohacking, Dave Asprey has embarked on a quest to reverse the aging process.

  • As a teenager, founder of Bulletproof, Dave Asprey, began experiencing health issues that typically plague older adults.
  • After surrounding himself with anti-aging researchers and scientists, he discovered the tools of biohacking could dramatically change his life and improve his health.
  • He's now confident he'll live to at least 180 years old. "It turns out that those tools that make older people young make younger people kick ass," he says.
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