Election results: How Twitter, Facebook plan to block misinformation

Both social media companies plan to implement special protocols on Tuesday as election results begin rolling in.

Credit: Twitter
  • Twitter says it will remove or add a warning to tweets that declare election wins before official results are declared, as determined by national media outlets.
  • When Twitter users try to retweet, the company will show them a prompt encouraging them to "quote tweet" (and thereby add their own commentary) instead, a move designed to slow the spread of misinformation.
  • Facebook plans to display election results, as determined by national media outlets, on posts from candidates who contest the results or declare early wins.
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Slactivism: The problem with moral outrage on the internet

Why virtue signaling does nothing.

"A big problem with moral outrage on the Internet is that it leads people to think they’ve done something when in fact they haven’t done something," says author Alice Dreger. Sure, you might get a little rush out of updating your status to say something, but all you're really doing is virtue signaling. Alice's latest book is Galileo's Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and One Scholar's Search for Justice.

This week in comments: February 4th—February 12th, 2018

We've got the biggest comments. The best comments. You're going to have such good comments that you're going to be sick of how good these comments are. Believe me. 

A single “Like” on Facebook can reveal a crucial aspect of your personality

The internet and social media have made persuasive appeals more powerful than ever before.

Credit: Getty Images.

The Police song “Every Breath You Take” has been popular for decades. For a hit from the early ‘80s, it’s shown surprising longevity. In an interview during its hay day, Police front man Sting, said he was stupefied that people had turned, what he termed a “creepy” and “ugly” song, into a love ballad. “It's about jealousy and surveillance and ownership," he told the New Musical Express in 1983. Today, it’s played at weddings.

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Your Facebook news feed is about to undergo a massive change

The social media behemoth wants you to use their platform less, not more, than before. 

Flickr, Anthony Quintano, Creative Commons

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