Secretive agency uses AI, human 'forecasters' to predict the future

A U.S. government intelligence agency develops cutting-edge tech to predict future events.

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  • The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), a research arm of the U.S. government intelligence community, is focused on predicting the future.
  • The organization uses teams of human non-experts and AI machine learning to forecast future events.
  • IARPA also conducts advanced research in numerous other fields, funding rotating programs.
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Top-secret U.S. space plane about to leave Earth for years

The Space Force will soon launch its X-37B spacecraft on a classified mission.

Credit: U.S. Air Force
  • The U.S. Air Force is preparing to launch its X-37B space drone made by Boeing.
  • The spacecraft is like a mini-space shuttle and is used to test technologies.
  • X-37B's missions are highly classified, leading to speculation about their purpose.
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Insightful ideas can trigger orgasmic brain signals, study finds

Research shows how "aha moments" affect the brain and cause the evolution of creativity.

Credit: Drexel University
  • New psychology study shows that some people have increased brain sensitivity for "aha moments."
  • The researchers scanned brains of participants and noticed orgasm-like signals during insights.
  • The scientists think this evolutionary adaptation drives creation of science and culture.
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Japanese scientists discover clue to erasing traumatic memories

Researchers make breakthrough in studying traumatic long-term memory in flies.

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  • Scientists in Japan find that light can affect long-term traumatic memories in flies.
  • Keeping male flies in the dark helped them overcome negative mating memories.
  • The researchers hope to use the finding to develop new treatments for PTSD and similar disorders.
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"Game changer" superconductor discovered to power future computers

Scientists from John Hopkins find a material for quantum computing.

Credit: Yufan Li
  • Researchers from John Hopkins University discovered a new superconducting material.
  • The material, called β-Bi2Pd, can create flex qubits, necessary for quantum computing.
  • Next for the scientists is looking for Majorana fermions.
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