Smartly dressed: Researchers develop clothes that sense movement via touch

Measuring a person's movements and poses, smart clothes could be used for athletic training, rehabilitation, or health-monitoring.

In recent years there have been exciting breakthroughs in wearable technologies, like smartwatches that can monitor your breathing and blood oxygen levels.

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​These light-emitting "smart" tattoos could act as medical monitors

Light-emitting tattoos could indicate dehydration in athletes or health conditions in hospital patients.

Credit: Barsotti - Italian Institute of Technology
  • Researchers at UCL and IIT have created a temporary tattoo that contains the same OLED technology that is used in TVs and smartphones.
  • This technology has already been successfully applied to various materials including glass, food items, plastic, and paper packaging.
  • This advance in technology isn't just about aesthetics. "In healthcare, they could emit light when there is a change in a patient's condition - or, if the tattoo was turned the other way into the skin, they could potentially be combined with light-sensitive therapies to target cancer cells, for instance," explains senior author Franco Cacialli of UCL.
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Could robots make better therapy animals?

Allergies might never be a concern again.

Photo: VTT Studio / Adobe Stock
  • University of Portsmouth researchers held play sessions with real dogs and their biomimetic counterparts.
  • The more time school children spent with the robot dog, the higher their opinion of him.
  • Robotic dogs could offer an entirely new line of emotional support animals.
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Tools for Mars are being developed in preparation for colonization

Turns out chitin is quite useful when you need a wrench.

Credit: Dotted Yeti / Shutterstock
  • Researchers at the Singapore University of Technology and Design constructed Mars-ready tools in preparation for colonization.
  • The team chose chitin as a cheap and abundant material to fashion a wrench and habitat.
  • Chitin occurs naturally in arthropod exoskeletons, fungus, and fish scales.
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Humans were born to run. Exoskeletons might make us better at it.

New research on ankle exoskeletons show promising results.

Photo: Getty Images
  • New research from Stanford finds that motor-powered ankle exoskeletons conserve 15 percent of energy expenditure when running.
  • Spring-powered exoskeletons without motors actually made running harder.
  • The researchers hope to develop better spring-powered models moving forward.
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