Playlist privacy: You can be identified from just three songs

Companies can identify you from your music preferences, as well as influence and profit from your behavior.

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  • New research discovered that you can be identified from just three song choices.
  • This type of information can be exploited by streaming services through targeted advertising.
  • The researchers are calling for musical preference to be considered in regulations regarding online privacy.
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  • The market for smart toys is rapidly expanding and could grow to $18 billion by 2023.
  • Smart toys can help with learning but pose risks if they are not designed to protect children's data and safety.
  • Many companies are developing smart toys ethically and responsibly, with makers of AI-powered smart toys encouraged to apply to the Smart Toy Awards.
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Enjoy a faster, more secure Internet connection with this highly-rated VPN

For only $70, you can get two years of protection when you browse or stream online with Private Internet Access.

  • Whether it's for work, school, or pleasure, it's no secret that the world spends the majority of the day online.
  • There's bound to be sensitive information floating around on your laptop or mobile device.
  • To ensure you have the fastest, most secure connection every time you log on, you can snag a two-year subscription to Private Internet Access VPN for just $69.95.
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Should law enforcement be using AI and cell phone data to find rioters?

The attack on the Capitol forces us to confront an existential question about privacy.

Credit: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images
  • The insurrection attempt at the Capitol was captured by thousands of cell phones and security cameras.
  • Many protestors have been arrested after their identity was reported to the FBI.
  • Surveillance experts warn about the dangers of using facial recognition to monitor protests.
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Scientists urge UN to add 'neuro-rights' to Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Neuroscientists and ethicists wants to ensure that neurotechnologies remain benevolent.

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  • Columbia University neuroscience professor Rafael Yuste is advocating for the UN to adopt "neuro-rights."
  • Neurotechnology is a growing field that includes a range of technologies that influence higher brain activities.
  • Ethicists fear that these technologies will be misused and abuses of privacy and even consciousness could follow.
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