Andrew Yang backs California’s data privacy campaign

"Our data should be ours no matter what platforms and apps we use," Yang said.

(Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
  • In November, Californians will vote to pass Proposition 24, which aims to expand data privacy laws in the state.
  • Proposition 24 aims to strengthen the California Consumer Privacy Act, which went into effect this year.
  • However, some privacy advocates say Proposition 24 doesn't go far enough, and in some cases actually erodes the CCPA.
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Police can track cars nationwide with new license plate surveillance network

The system is basically facial recognition technology, but for cars.

Flock Safety
  • Some police departments use automatic license plate readers to track suspects.
  • A company called Flock Safety is now allowing police departments to opt in to a national network, which shares data on car movements.
  • Privacy advocates are concerned about the potential for errors and abuse.
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Therapy app Talkspace mined user data for marketing insights, former employees allege

A report from the New York Times raises questions over how the teletherapy startup Talkspace handles user data.

Talkspace.com
  • In the report, several former employees said that "individual users' anonymized conversations were routinely reviewed and mined for insights."
  • Talkspace denied using user data for marketing purposes, though it acknowledged that it looks at client transcripts to improve its services.
  • It's still unclear whether teletherapy is as effective as traditional therapy.
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How face masks are fooling facial recognition software

A new study explores how wearing a face mask affects the error rates of popular facial recognition algorithms.

Credit: B. Hayes/NIST
  • The study measured the error rates of 89 commercial facial recognition technologies as they attempted to match photos of people with and without masks.
  • Wearing a mask increased error rates by 5 to 50 percent among the algorithms.
  • The researchers said they expect facial recognition technology to get better at recognizing people wearing masks. But it's not clear that that's what Americans want.
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How governments are responding to the public's demand for more data transparency

Innovative use of blockchain tech, data trusts, algorithm assessments, and cultural shifts abound.

Depositphotos
  • A study published last year by the Pew Research Center found that most American's distrust the federal government, and there's plenty of evidence to suggest that the situation has yet to improve.
  • Governments have more access than ever to our private information, which creates an inherent tension between how they can use data for the public good while ensuring they aren't abusing citizens' privacy rights.
  • As emerging technologies mature, it will become more evident to the public which models are the most effective ways for governments to achieve the levels of transparency they've committed to delivering.

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