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David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
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Bryan Cranston
Actor
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Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
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Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
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Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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The Anthropause is here: COVID-19 reduced Earth's vibrations by 50 percent

The planet is making a lot less noise during lockdown.

Photo by Eric Rojas/Getty Images
  • A team of researchers found that Earth's vibrations were down 50 percent between March and May.
  • This is the quietest period of human-generated seismic noise in recorded history.
  • The researchers believe this helps distinguish between natural vibrations and human-created vibrations.
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3 questions to ask yourself next time you see a graph, chart, or map

Start by reading the title, looking at the labels and checking the caption. If these are not available – be very wary.

Photo by Giacomo Carra on Unsplash

Since the days of painting on cave walls, people have been representing information through figures and images.

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The sun is setting on unsustainable long-haul, short-stay tourism — regional travel bubbles are the future

The trans-Tasman and Pacific bubbles will likely be among the first safe international travel zones in the world.

Photo by Bambi Corro on Unsplash
Unprecedented border closures and the domestic lockdown have paralysed New Zealand's $40.9 billion a year tourism industry.
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Signs of Covid-19 may be hidden in speech signals

Studying voice recordings of infected but asymptomatic people reveals potential indicators of Covid-19.

Ezra Acayan/Getty Images
It's often easy to tell when colleagues are struggling with a cold — they sound sick.
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How often do vaccine trials hit paydirt?

Vaccines find more success in development than any other kind of drug, but have been relatively neglected in recent decades.

Pedro Vilela/Getty Images

Vaccines are more likely to get through clinical trials than any other type of drug — but have been given relatively little pharmaceutical industry support during the last two decades, according to a new study by MIT scholars.

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