Do we actually grow from adversity?

"That which does not kill us, makes us stronger"?

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In our culture, there's this idea that enduring a tragedy can be good for your personal growth. You'll have a newfound appreciation for life.

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Understanding the psychology of distraction can help you stay on task

Could your urge to check emails — instead of finishing that major project — be a response to an uncomfortable emotional state?

  • It's easy to stumble down a rabbit hole when we consider the action beneficial like checking emails, stock prices, or sports scores.
  • However, if these seemingly beneficial actions take the place of something else we intended to do, they're just distractions. And we've been moved to these distraction as a psychological response to discomfort.
  • The truth is that distraction comes from within, and time management is just another form of pain management.
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Why we love big, blood-curdling screams

Among the variety of human screams, it is screams of terror that stand out most vividly.

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Of all the sounds humans produce, nothing captures our attention quite like a good scream.

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How personal experience of adversity affects our feelings of compassion towards others

Researchers measured high- and low-adversity participants' feelings of compassion.

Albert Gonza‡lez Farran/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Imagine seeing a photograph of a suffering child in the war-torn region of Darfur, in Sudan.

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How can doctors tell if you wake up during surgery?

Researchers are only just beginning to really understand anaesthesia awareness.

Waking up during surgery – it's terrifying to think about. But it does happen.

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