Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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A breakthrough in chronic pain relief

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen might have discovered a cure.

  • A team at the University of Copenhagen discovered a peptide that cured mice of chronic pain with no side effects.
  • An estimated 7-10 percent of the world's population suffers from chronic pain.
  • The peptide, Tat-P4-(C5)2, previously showed signs of curing addiction in mice.
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    Maslow’s hierarchy of needs: Updated for the 21st century

    Rather than trekking up a mountain, a more accurate metaphor for human development involves navigating the waters of a choppy sea.

    • When we imagine Maslow's famous hierarchy of needs, we visualize a pyramid. This is all wrong, says humanistic psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman.
    • This is because life isn't a video game, where you unlock new levels until you reach the final prize of self-actualization. In fact, Maslow viewed human development as a two steps forward, one step back dynamic.
    • Kaufman rebuilt Maslow's hierarchy of needs, updating it for the 21st century with a solid scientific foundation. And a better metaphor for this is a sailboat.
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    Being dominant in the bedroom can boost your work ethic

    Studies have shown that dominant sexual activity can often boost your work ethic several days after a sexual experience.

    Photo by Kopytin Georgy on Shutterstock
    • Sex is a complex and intricate human experience that involves many different neurological processes.
    • Different sexual activities can alter this process, causing different combinations of hormones to be released.
    • Being dominant during sex can cause altered states of consciousness that include heightened concentration and communication, better decision-making processes, and boosted self-confidence, all of which can help you excel in the workplace even days after your sexual experience.

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    Why helicopter parenting backfires on kids

    Childhood is an important developmental feature of being human. Helicopter parenting disrupts that.

    • "Helicopter parenting, and all of its associated forms, prevents children from exploring their emotional and intellectual landscape, and often their physical landscape as well, such that they become adults in body only," says evolutionary biologist Heather Heying.
    • Childhood is an important developmental stage that trains kids for messy, uncontrollable reality. If adults don't teach kids how to solve their own problems, or if they prevent them from experiencing harm, children become less capable adults who don't know how to deal with real injury and insult.
    • Parents can help their children by teaching them to be anti-fragile. Children grow from being exposed to ideas with which they disagree, encountering negative emotions, and engaging in activities with real-world outcomes like sport, cooking, and DIY.

    The psychology of healing from sexual trauma

    A deeper look at what happens in the first 2 years after experiencing sexual trauma.

    Photo by Mihai Surdu on Shutterstock

    Content Warning:
    The content in this article may be triggering to some readers. This article contains discussion around the topics of sexual assault, rape, sexual violence, trauma and PTSD. Please read at your own discretion.


    • Between 17-25% of women and 1-3% of men will report an instance of sexual abuse within their lifetime - however, research suggests up to 80% of sexual violence goes unreported, so the number of people who have experienced sexual abuse is much higher than you think.
    • A 2004 study takes a look at the psychological healing process sexual abuse survivors experience within the first 21 months after their assault.
    • Results of this study prove the decrease in behavioral self-blame that survivors reported feeling within the first 21 months after their attack greatly aided in their recovery.
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