Electricity and fear: The trouble with nuclear energy

Although everyone knows that coal-based energy is a thing of the past, declarations about nuclear power plants somehow do not want to enter into force.

Photo by Viktor Kiryanov on Unsplash

No other power-generating device raises as much concern as the nuclear reactor. Because of this, until recently the future of the entire energy sector has been determined by its past.

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Nano diamond batteries have one company all charged-up

Utilizing nuclear waste converted to diamonds, the company's batteries will reportedly last thousands of years in some cases.

Image source: Oleksii Biriukov/Shutterstock
  • Nuclear reactor parts converted to radioactive carbon-14 diamonds produce energy.
  • To keep them safe, the carbon-14 diamonds are encased in a second protective diamond layer.
  • The company predicts batteries for personal devices could last about nine years.
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Physicists discover how to safely create star power on Earth

Princeton scientists find a new way to control nuclear fusion reactions.

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. (Courtesy: NASA/SDO)
  • A new study from Princeton physicists successfully uses boron powder to control nuclear reactions in plasma.
  • Creating plasma can lead to an unlimited supply of energy.
  • The new method is cheaper and less dangerous than previous approaches.
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Vodka for your post-apocalypse wingding

It's made from Chernobyl water and rye. What could possibly go wrong?

Image source: Chernobyl Spirits Company/lux3000/Shutterstock/Big Think
  • 33 years later, parts of the exclusion zone may be ready to be reclaimed.
  • The beverage similar to Ukrainian vodka will soon be available.
  • Raise a glass to the renewable Earth.
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Mysterious radiation leak, 100x larger than Fukushima disaster, traced to Russian facility

Russia's state-owned nuclear corporation Rosatom denies the allegations.

Pixabay
  • The nuclear leak occurred in 2017 and was recorded by scientists in multiple European countries.
  • No nation or organization has ever claimed responsibility for the leak, which, while massive, is not believed to have harmed anyone.
  • The new study used more than 1,300 measurements to trace the likely source of the leak to the Urals region of Russia, where lies the Mayak nuclear complex.
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