How a Nobel Prize winner moves from data to discovery

How do you develop the next big idea? You pull together people who are both curious and passionate.

  • In 2018, Dr. Jim Allison was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for discovering an effective way to attack cancer through immunology.
  • In pursuing this discovery, he recruited other scientists who were curious, who cared about and were committed to science. "You have to put up with a lot of failure, 'cause if you're not, you're probably doing boring stuff," Allison says.
  • When it comes to developing a theory that works, it's critical to ask as many people as possible on a project for their hypotheses on why a particular outcome may take place. By pulling together these ideas, and testing them, better data can be accumulated.
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2019 Nobel Prizes: What you can learn from this year's winners

From literature to physics, the annual Nobel Prizes aim to highlight the most groundbreaking achievements in every field.

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  • Each year, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awards six Nobel Prizes.
  • The categories are: literature, physics, chemistry, peace, economics, and physiology & medicine.
  • The Nobel prizes will be announced each business-day until October 14.
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Hypoxia researchers win 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine

Three scientist friends, working separately, share the prestigious prize.

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  • Nobel recognizes breakthrough insights into cell's perception and response to changes in oxygen levels.
  • Too title oxygen is a problem. Also too much.
  • Their research unveiled a genuine "textbook discovery."
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Great risk for great gain: Immigrants and innovators are psychologically the same

Don't denigrate immigrants, says Jared Diamond. You are one.

  • Every American, without exception, is an immigrant. Native Americans immigrated 13,000 years ago, and everybody else has immigrated within the last 400 years.
  • The decision to emigrate is made by people who are healthy, strong, willing to undertake risks, and face the unknown. Those are also essential qualities for innovating.
  • It's no coincidence that the great majority of American Nobel Prize winners are either first-generation immigrants or the children of first-generation immigrants.
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Objective reality may not exist, European researchers say

A new experiment shows that two observers can experience divergent realities (if they go subatomic).

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  • In 1961, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Eugene Wigner proposed a thought experiment by which the reality of two observers can diverge by measuring a single photon.
  • Researchers recently tested Wigner's thought experiment and concluded that realities can be made irreconcilable.
  • Do these results put the entire scientific method at risk? Let's not get ahead of ourselves.
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