The world's largest solar power project begins running in UAE

Will the small petrol state soon be solar powered?

WAM
  • The United Arab Emirates is on a solar kick — it has just opened the world's largest solar farm.
  • This is only one of several huge power plants they've opened recently.
  • While the country is still heavily dependent on oil, the new solar plants may change things.
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Technology & Innovation

5 facts you should know about the world’s refugees

Many governments do not report, or misreport, the numbers of refugees who enter their country.

David McNew/Getty Images

Conflict, violence, persecution and human rights violations led to a record high of 70.8 million people being displaced by the end of 2018.

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Politics & Current Affairs

The U.S. military emits more greenhouse gases than Sweden and Denmark

The war machine needs fuel, perhaps so much as to make protecting oil redundant.

Joe McNally/Getty Images
  • A new study shows how the United States' Military is the largest institutional emitter of greenhouse gasses in the world.
  • These emissions come from both combat and non-combat operations.
  • The use of some of the fossil fuels the military burns to protect the supply of oil creates an interesting paradox.
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Politics & Current Affairs

These are the world’s most fragile states in 2019

Yemen leads the list of the most fragile nations, with the U.S. and U.K. among the "most worsened."

MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images

There are some rankings no nation wants to lead.

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Politics & Current Affairs

Why Blackwater cannot be the future of U.S. warfare

Can 6,500 mercenaries "fix" Afghanistan? The U.S. is resurrecting privatized warfare.

  • The West has stopped winning wars because it still operates on WWII strategies, says Sean McFate. Poor strategy results in so-called 'forever wars'.
  • To end the nearly 20-year-long war in Afghanistan, the U.S. is considering replacing all U.S. troops with Blackwater mercenaries.
  • Why is that so dangerous? Because this is what the future looks like when you resurrect privatized warfare.
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