We’ve achieved diversity in the workplace. Now what?

What good is diversity without inclusion?

  • Striving for more diversity (in all its forms) is good, but it's what you do with and for those new voices that can change the landscape of a company. Why does diversity matter and how does it factor into the competitive environment?
  • Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), says that inclusion is the "real holy grail" in terms of making the most of diversity.
  • Diversity strategies have evolved over time to focus more on commonality. Taylor says that by starting with what people have in common, we can learn to respect each other's differences.
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Men vs. women: Why we’re imagining equality all wrong

It's possible to seek equality without seeking sameness.

  • Males and females as a population, on average, are different. Beyond obvious differences in reproductive systems, research has shown measurable differences between the sexes in areas such as linguistic capabilities.
  • Evolutionary biologist Heather Heying argues that while males and females should be equal under the law, that does not mean that their differences should be ignored. "We should seek equality without seeking sameness."
  • People should be given the freedom to make choices, not forced to engage in activities in the name of equality.
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Sexist ideologies may help cultivate the "dark triad" of personality traits

People who score highly on the dark triad are vain, callous, and manipulative.

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The "dark triad" of personality traits — narcissism, psychopathy and Machiavellianism — do not make for the nicest individuals.

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Let’s talk sex: The science of your brain on dirty talk

One in five people have ended sex because of bad bedroom talk. Here's the data and science on how to do it right.

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  • One in five people in a new study admit that they have stopped sex cold because of the dirty talk.
  • 90% of the participants felt aroused by the right erotic talk with their partner.
  • Dirty talk activates the erogenous zones of the brain: the hypothalamus and amygdala.
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Dad bod & dad brain: how a man's brain changes when he becomes a father

The bonding experience is promoted by important neurological changes.

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  • In the first days and weeks of fatherhood, a man's testosterone and cortisol levels decrease and oxytocin, estrogen, and prolactin levels surge, promoting an important bonding experience between a father and his newborn child.
  • One of the most significant changes in a new father's brain is the new neurons that are formed that have been proved to be directly linked to the time spent with their newborn child.
  • This neurogenesis (forming of new neurons in the brain) happens in the areas that are linked to long-term memory and navigation.
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