Machines probably aren’t interested in global takeover. Here’s why.

What most people worry about when it comes to artificial intelligence likely comes from science-fiction fantasy.

  • When someone says they fear artificial intelligence, what are they imagining? Robots taking over the world is the stuff of science-fiction fantasy.
  • Despite decades of beating humans at the game of Go, AI has never developed the desire to take over actual territory. The reality is that machines are not resourceful and have no interest in us.
  • Although AI plays an increasingly important role in our lives, we have a ways to go before deep learning and machines are solving all of our problems.
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The biggest problem in AI? Machines have no common sense.

Correlation doesn't equal causation — we all know this. Well, except robots.

  • There are a lot of people in the tech world who think that if we collect as much data possible, and run a lot of statistics, that we will be able to develop robots where artificial "intelligence" organically emerges.
  • However, many A.I.'s that currently exist aren't close to being "intelligent," it's difficult to even program common sense into them. The reason for this is because correlation doesn't always equal causation — robots that operate on correlation alone may have skewed algorithms in which to operate in the real world.
  • When it comes to performing simple tasks, such as opening a door, we currently don't know how to encode that information — the varied process that is sometimes required in differing situations, i.e. jiggling the key, turning the key just right — into a language that a computer can understand.

Gary Marcus is the author of Rebooting AI: Building Artificial Intelligence We Can Trust.

Aristo A.I. scores ‘A’ on 8th-grade science test

An A.I. named Aristo was able to use its language and logic skills to pass a standardized exam with flying colors.

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  • An A.I. called Aristo, developed by the Allen Institute, was able to correctly answer 90 percent of questions on a science exam designed for eighth graders.
  • The success represents recent progress in the A.I. industry to develop systems that understand language.
  • It doesn't mean computers are nearly as smart as eighth-graders, but it does suggest we might soon see some striking improvements in A.I.-based technology.
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Many vegetative patients are actually 'covertly conscious'

This unsettling new understanding of vegetative patients raises medical ethics issues.

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  • For a long time, doctors assessed whether patients were in vegetative states through behavioral tests.
  • However, brain scans have revealed that some of these patients are actually in a state of "covert consciousness."
  • Covertly conscious patients are aware of their surroundings, but cannot respond to external stimuli.
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Five ways your safety depends on machine learning

Machine learning, which actively protects you from all sorts of dangers, including fires, explosions, collapses, crashes, workplace accidents, restaurant E. coli, and crime.

  • Your safety depends on machine learning.
  • It's not a cure-all -- unfortunately, there's no way to achieve 100% guaranteed security in this life.
  • Here are some example insights that help predict peril, which were told to us by data.
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