Top 5 factors that make or break a relationship, according to AI

A new study used artificial intelligence to analyze relationship data from thousands of couples.

Credit: Pixabay
  • Artificial intelligence discovered key relationship predictors in psychology study of over 11,000 couples.
  • The researchers utilized machine learning to find the best predictors of relationship success and failure.
  • The study showed the survival of a relationship depends more on its quality than individual characteristics of the people.
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Can a robot guess what you're thinking?

It's a very human behavior—arguably one of the fundamentals that makes us us.

Photo by Andy Kelly on Unsplash
What on earth are you thinking? Other people think they know, and many could make a pretty decent guess, simply from observing your behavior for a short while.
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Can your smartphone detect how drunk you are?

A small proof-of-concept study shows smartphones could help detect drunkenness based on the way you walk.

Photo by wavebreakmedia on Shutterstock
  • The legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for driving in the U.S is 0.08 percent. You can measure your BAC 15 minutes after your first drink and your levels will remain safe if you consume no more than one standard drink per hour.
  • Portable breathalyzers can be used to measure BAC, but not many people own these devices.
  • A small proof-of-concept study suggests that your smartphone could detect your drunkenness based on the way you walk.
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AI feat helps machines learn at speed of light without supervision

Researchers discover how to use light instead of electricity to advance artificial intelligence.

CREDIT: Mario Miscuglio
  • Researchers at George Washington University discover how to supercharge AI machine learning.
  • Their method uses photons instead of electricity.
  • The approach allows artificial intelligence to learn independently, without needing as much power.
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    Does conscious AI deserve rights?

    If machines develop consciousness, or if we manage to give it to them, the human-robot dynamic will forever be different.

    • Does AI—and, more specifically, conscious AI—deserve moral rights? In this thought exploration, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, ethics and tech professor Joanna Bryson, philosopher and cognitive scientist Susan Schneider, physicist Max Tegmark, philosopher Peter Singer, and bioethicist Glenn Cohen all weigh in on the question of AI rights.
    • Given the grave tragedy of slavery throughout human history, philosophers and technologists must answer this question ahead of technological development to avoid humanity creating a slave class of conscious beings.
    • One potential safeguard against that? Regulation. Once we define the context in which AI requires rights, the simplest solution may be to not build that thing.

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