Will robots free people from slavery?

Even if automation makes human trafficking economically inefficient, that alone won't end this unethical practice.

  • Robotic automation may one day make slavery economically inefficient, but automation does not spring forth fully formed.
  • An interim period of piecemeal coverage may leave many at-risk, low-skilled workers in danger of exploitation.
  • Nor can automation sate the political and social motives for slavery found in some societies.
Keep reading Show less

Have we reached a humane alternative to the war on drugs?

Can treating addiction as a disease work better than treating it as a vice?

Getty Images
  • The War on Drugs has taken fifty years of America's time, and an unfathomable amount of our blood and treasure.
  • A new method for dealing with drug abuse, treating it as a disease rather than a moral failure, is being tried.
  • Studies suggest this is a better way to deal with the problem, and programs using this view are seeing success.
Keep reading Show less

An astronaut may have committed identity theft on the ISS, NASA is investigating

The alleged identity theft may be the first space crime.

Image source: NASA
  • NASA astronaut Anne McClain was accused by her ex-wife for identity theft.
  • The alleged crime was committed on the International Space Station from a NASA computer.
  • Current legal channels exist to solve this dispute, but more heinous or international space crimes are going to be harder to reconcile.
Keep reading Show less

Opioid crisis: Johnson & Johnson ordered to pay $572 million

What's next for the nation's opioid cases?

John Moore / Staff
  • Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay the state of Oklahoma $572 million for downplaying the dangers and overselling the benefits of opioids.
  • The state's lawyers argued that Johnson & Johnson had violated a public nuisance law, which concerns injuries to public health.
  • The first federal trial in the opioid crisis is scheduled for October. It's likely that the Oklahoma verdict doesn't help drug manufacturers and distributors.
Keep reading Show less

There are 12 million stateless people in the world. Who are they?

Without a country to belong to, many of these people lack some of the most fundamental rights.

Shutterstock
  • According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the world is host to 12 million people who don't officially belong to any state.
  • People can become stateless through a variety of means, including racial discrimination, sexist nationality laws, voluntary choice, or bureaucratic accidents.
  • Who are these millions of stateless individuals? What is life like for them? Can their situation be solved?
Keep reading Show less