Higher incomes tied to better emotional states — but there's a catch

A study of 1.6 million people ties high incomes with more positive emotions and fewer negative ones, but only towards the self.

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  • A review of data from 1.6 million people shows that higher incomes relate to more positive feelings about the self.
  • Feelings towards others were not affected by higher incomes.
  • The findings have implications for those hoping to improve society by raising incomes alone.
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10 ways to prepare for the rise of intelligent machines – MIT study

A new MIT report proposes how humans should prepare for the age of automation and artificial intelligence.

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  • A new report by MIT experts proposes what humans should do to prepare for the age of automation.
  • The rise of intelligent machines is coming but it's important to resolve human issues first.
  • Improving economic inequality, skills training, and investment in innovation are necessary steps.
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Can the U.S. fix unemployment with 'Universal Basic Jobs'?

What would happen if the U.S. guaranteed every citizen a job with a living wage and benefits?


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  • A new book from Pavlina Tcherneva, chair of the economics department at New York's Bard College, makes the case for a "Job Guarantee" federal program.
  • The program would grant jobs to every citizen who's willing and able to work.
  • A 2019 poll found that a majority of Americans would support a federally funded jobs program.
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How our micro-internships can help fill the COVID employment gap

With 45% of recent college graduates under or unemployed, it's time to explore new solutions.

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  • Parker Dewey connects recent grads with top employers on a per-project basis.
  • We think hiring is badly broken (nobody's fault!), and ours is a good solution.
  • Over 90% of individuals who complete a Parker Dewey project are employed in professional roles, compared with 64% of other college grads.
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COVID-19 is accelerating the pace of automation and the need for UBI

The pandemic has given us an early glimpse at how truly disruptive the fourth industrial revolution may be, and the measures we'll need to support human dignity.

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  • The coronavirus crisis has acted as a catalyst for two powerful transformative forces: automation and universal basic income.
  • These two intertwined forces will undoubtedly gain steam, writes Frederick Kuo, and the pandemic will hasten the acceptance of them from a scale of decades to years or mere months.
  • This crisis has ushered in a glimpse of what a dystopian future could look like as a rapidly advancing fourth industrial revolution inevitably causes severe disruption in our economy and labor structure.
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