Can we resurrect the dead? Researchers catalogue potential future methods

From cryonics to time travel, here are some of the (highly speculative) methods that might someday be used to bring people back to life.

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  • Alexey Turchin and Maxim Chernyakov, researchers belonging to the transhumanism movement, wrote a paper outlining the main ways technology might someday make resurrection possible.
  • The methods are highly speculative, ranging from cryonics to digital reconstruction of individual personalities.
  • Surveys suggest most people would not choose to live forever if given the option.
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How DNA revealed the woolly mammoth's fate – and what it teaches us today

Scientists uncovered the secrets of what drove some of the world's last remaining woolly mammoths to extinction.

Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Every summer, children on the Alaskan island of St Paul cool down in Lake Hill, a crater lake in an extinct volcano – unaware of the mysteries that lie beneath.

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4 ways to promote neurogenesis in your brain

How can we promote the creation of new neurons - and why is it so important?

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  • Neurogenesis, the birth of neurons from stem cells, happens mostly before we are born - as we are formed in the womb, we are generating most of what we need after birth.
  • After birth, neurogenesis is still possible in two parts of the brain: the olfactory bulb (which is responsible for our sense of smell) and the hippocampus (which is responsible for memory, spatial navigation, and emotional processing).
  • Research from the 1960s proves creating new neurons as adults is possible, and modern-day research explains how (and why) we should promote new neuron growth.
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4 key questions to challenge your views on genetic engineering

New research shows how Americans feel about genetic engineering, human enhancement and automation.

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  • A review of Pew Research studies reveals the views of Americans on the role of science in society.
  • 4 key questions were asked to gauge feelings on genetic engineering, automation and human enhancement.
  • Americans are split in how they view technology and many worry about its growing role.
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Mystery virus found with mostly unknown DNA

The origin and phylogeny of the Yaravirus are not yet clear.

Image source: Rost9/Shutterstock/Big Think
  • A virus has been found whose DNA is 90% absolutely unfamiliar.
  • Scientists have no real idea what it developed from, or how.
  • Viruses used to be thought of as simple, jumbles of things — not so much any more.
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