Falsely accused? Stay calm, because anger makes you look guilty

Anger and silence are the two worst reactions.

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  • A new study conducted various experiments to explore the relationship between anger and judgments of guilt.
  • The results suggest that when an accused person becomes angry, perceivers are more likely to view that person as guilty, even though the accused might be innocent.
  • Paradoxically, the study also found that people who are falsely accused generally become angrier than people who are rightfully accused.
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Research finds narcissists are not just self-absorbed, they're also more likely to be aggressive

Participants with high levels of narcissism showed high levels of aggression, spreading gossip, bullying others, and more.

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We recently reviewed 437 studies of narcissism and aggression involving a total of over 123,000 participants and found narcissism is related to a 21% increase in aggression and an 18% increase in violence.
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When doubts about a relationship start to creep in, people don't just blurt them out. They might not want to worry their partner and figure they'll ride out what could just be a rough patch. They probably think they can hide their feelings pretty easily.

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How gratitude makes you more attractive

Social interactions are important for building the strongest relationships.

  • When someone says thank you, who is it for? According to Dr. Sara Algoe, expressions of gratitude have a positive effect on the person receiving the message, the person delivering it, and even those who witness the exchange. These types of social interactions are crucial for building lasting relationships with romantic partners, friends, and coworkers.
  • "When we say 'thank you,' we're sending a message to the person who just did something nice for us, that they are valued, that they're seen, that the thing that they did for us was worth doing in the first place," Algoe says.
  • Expressing gratitude is easy, and the research shows that the benefits far outweigh the effort.

Regret over a hookup doesn’t change our behavior

A study finds that sexual regret doesn't change how we behave in the future.

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  • Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology investigate the degree to which regret regarding sexual encounters makes us modify our behavior.
  • Women more often have regrets about encounters that occurred, while men regret the ones that didn't.
  • According to the study, people keep doing what they've been doing and continue to have the same regrets.
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