Why do we feel schadenfreude — and who it feels it the most?

Delving into the psychology of an uncommon joy.

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  • Few words convey as much meaning as Schadenfreude, or the joy that arises from seeing harm come to others.
  • Schadenfreude is a complex psychological phenomenon, and researchers have only begun to look into rigorously.
  • Psychology can tell us why we feel schadenfreude, when we feel it, and who feels it the most.
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Researchers say humor is a powerful tool against depression

They say laughter is the best medicine; you might not be able to laugh a broken leg away, but it might help your depression.

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  • A new study examined 55 individuals recovering from major depression to see how well humor worked as a coping mechanism against stress.
  • Individuals at risk for depression often fall into depressive episodes because of faulty coping mechanisms.
  • Research indicates that humor works as a powerful defense against depression.
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6 signs you’re in an emotionally strong relationship

These powerful habits from six powerful people are worth taking to heart.

One of the most important yet underappreciated parts of a happy, fulfilling relationship is emotional strength — but what does that really mean? Research shows that emotional strength primarily comes down to maintaining a healthy perspective, a trait that's ever more important within the context of romantic relationships, where opportunities for miscommunication and unhealthy habits can be plentiful.

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Loneliness not only feels bad, experts have characterised it as a disease that increases the risk of a range of physical and psychological disorders. Some national prevalence estimates for loneliness are alarming. Although they can be as low as 4.4 per cent (in Azerbaijan), in other countries (such as Denmark) as many as 20 per cent of adults report being either moderately or severely lonely.

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Why American culture gets mistakes all wrong

Mistakes are part of learning, not a failure of character.

A young woman smokes a cigarette during a break outside an office building on May 4, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. Smoking is banned in Germany in restaurants and most indoor venues. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
  • Americans treat mistakes as character flaws, write Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson.
  • The Japanese, by contrast, treat errors as an essential part of personal growth.
  • Coming clean about our mistakes helps us earn trust and feel better about ourselves.
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