Psilocybin rapidly promotes neuroplasticity in the brains of rats

The compound found in "magic mushrooms" has significant and fast-acting impact on the brains of rats.

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  • Psilocybin and psilocin are chemical compounds found in "magic mushrooms."
  • A recent study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology found very interesting results when psilocybin was administered to rats to research the potential impact the chemical could have on the human brain.
  • Several studies have suggested that psilocybin could be a treatment for depression.
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Some sleep is worse than no sleep for keeping fear in check

Getting plenty of sleep just became even more important.

Credit: Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels
  • A new study finds that people without sleep fare better in learning what to fear and not fear than those getting only some sleep.
  • Test subjects learned to associate colors with electric shocks, but only some unlearned it.
  • The findings could be used to help create new treatments for those at risk of PTSD or anxiety.
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Remote education is decreasing anxiety, increasing wellbeing for some students

A recent NIHR report found that students with previously low connectedness scores saw improvement in well-being and eased anxiety.

  • With coronavirus resurging in Europe and the United States, parents are worried about their children's well-being and mental health.
  • A report from the U.K.'s NIHR extends some hope; it found that students' mental health is improving while remote learning.
  • Parents will continue play an important role in supporting their children's mental health.
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Should parents de-emphasize gender norms?

The color of toys has a much deeper effect on children than some parents may realize.

  • The idea that blue is for boys and pink is for girls plays out in gender reveals and in the toy aisle, but where does it come from and what limits is it potentially placing on children?
  • Lisa Selin Davis traces the gendering of toys and other objects back to the 1920s and explains how, over time, these marketing strategies were falsely conflated with biological traits.
  • The "pink-blue divide" affects boys and girls on a psychological level. For example, psychologists discovered that when girls exit their intense 'pink princess' phase between ages 3-6 and move into a tomboy 'I hate pink' phase at age 6-8 "that is actually a moment of girls realizing that what's marked as feminine is devalued and so they're distancing themselves from it to prop themselves up higher on the ladder," says Selin Davis.
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Photo by Kate Trifo on Unsplash
You wear your mask, keep six feet between yourself and others and are committed to safety.
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