Coffee and green tea may lower death risk for some adults

Tea and coffee have known health benefits, but now we know they can work together.


Credit: NIKOLAY OSMACHKO from Pexels
  • A new study finds drinking large amounts of coffee and tea lowers the risk of death in some adults by nearly two thirds.
  • This is the first study to suggest the known benefits of these drinks are additive.
  • The findings are great, but only directly apply to certain people.
Keep reading Show less

Only 35 percent of Americans know the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

Yet 80 percent of respondents want to reduce their risk of dementia.

Photo: Lightspring / Shutterstock
  • A new MDVIP/Ipsos survey found that only 35 percent of Americans know the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.
  • Eighty percent of respondents said they want to reduce their risks.
  • An estimated 7.1 million Americans over the age of 65 will suffer from Alzheimer's by 2025.
Keep reading Show less

Can you manipulate your brain to stop your food cravings?

New research conducted on the brains of mice suggest it may be possible to "switch off" particular food cravings.

Photo by AshTproductions on Shutterstock
  • A food craving can be described as an intense desire for a specific food. This desire can seem uncontrollable at times.
  • Emerging research suggests it may be possible to "switch off" the pleasure feelings we experience from eating certain foods, which could curb cravings.
  • This could be groundbreaking in terms of new eating disorder treatments.

Keep reading Show less

Say goodbye to the beloved banana

Those bananas you love are Cavendish bananas, and they're probably about to go extinct.

Credit: Shutter Chiller/Shutterstock
  • The world's most popular edible variety is about to be wiped out by a fungal invader. Again.
  • We've already lost Gros Michel bananas, which were the world's favorite until the 1960s.
  • The solution? Possibly genetic editing, but more likely a greater availability of exotic varieties.

Keep reading Show less

Not much is happening in self-isolation. So why are you still so tired?

Thankfully, there are ways to combat mental and physical fatigue, even in isolation.

  • With tens of millions of Americans sheltering at home, many people feel exhausted.
  • Reasons range from a lack of routine, emotional uncertainty, poor nutrition, and alcohol abuse.
  • Keeping your daily habits in place as much as possible is important for combating lethargy.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast