Millennials reconsidering finances and future under COVID-19

A new survey found that 27 percent of millennials are saving more money due to the pandemic, but most can't stay within their budgets.

  • Millennials have been labeled the "unluckiest generation in U.S. history" after the one-two financial punch of the Great Recession and the pandemic shutdowns.
  • A recent survey found that about a third of millennials felt financially unprepared for the pandemic and have begun saving.
  • To achieve financial freedom, millennials will need to take control of their finances and reinterpret their relationship with the economy.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Personal finance: How to save, spend, and think rationally about money

    Finances can be a stressor, regardless of tax bracket. Here are tips for making better money decisions.

    • Whether you have a lot of money or a lot of debt, it matters how you handle your personal finances. A crucial step when it comes to saving is to reassess your relationship with money and to learn to adopt a broader, more logical point of view.
    • In this video, social innovator and activist Vicki Robin, psychologist Daniel Kahneman, Harvard Business School professor Michael Norton, and author Bruce Feiler offer advice on achieving financial independence, learning to control your emotions, spending smarter, and teaching children about money.
    • It all starts with education and understanding. The more you know about how money works, the better you will be at avoiding mistakes and the easier it will be to take control of your financial circumstances.
    Keep reading Show less

    Should universal basic income be used as an antidepressant?

    Johann Hari knows that mental health is really a social issue.

    Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images
    • Johann Hari believes we need to treat universal basic income as an antidepressant.
    • In his book, Lost Connections, he writes that 65-80% of people on antidepressant medication are still depressed.
    • Instead of treating depression as a chemical imbalance, we need to look at the social causes really driving it.
    Keep reading Show less

    How a healthy sex life can earn you more money

    More frequent sex has been linked with higher income rates, according to a 2013 study.

    Image by Mehaniq on Shutterstock
    • A 2013 study associated more frequent sex with higher income rates. The initial hypothesis suggested that medical, psychological and physical positive effects of sexual activity could influence wage factors in working adults.
    • Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs all tie in with a healthy sex life, according to several studies listed below.
    • Scoring high on Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is directly linked to securing and maintaining high-wage income and making smarter financial decisions.
    Keep reading Show less

    The psychology of shopping addiction

    Is obsessive shopping a compulsion, an addiction, or both?

    Photo by Just dance on Shutterstock
    • Shopping might be one of the most socially acceptable addictions, but it's still a very powerful one that up to 6% of our population struggles with.
    • Shopping addiction is a predominantly female problem, with around 90% of shopaholics being women.
    • The neurotransmitter dopamine (which is also activated when we indulge in addictive substances such as alcohol or addictive behaviors like gambling) floods our system when we buy new things.
    Keep reading Show less
    Quantcast