20% of gamblers attempt suicide — why don't we take the addiction more seriously?

Americans lost $116.9 billion gambling in 2016.

Patrons test their luck with a card game slot machine at the renovated Gulfstream Park Racing & Casino November 15, 2006 in Hallandale Beach, Florida. The slot machines are the state of Florida's first Las Vegas-style slot machines. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
  • Gambling addiction has been shown to have the same pharmacological effects as opiates.
  • Eighty-five percent of all gambling revenue comes from slot machines.
  • Casinos are designed to disorient and confuse patrons, from the lighting and carpeting to the key of machine sounds.
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How to ask for a raise as a millennial

Dear millennials. Ask for a raise. Every single year.

  • Millennials objectively have it harder than past generations. Wages are stagnant while housing, healthcare, and education costs soar.
  • Ask for a raise every year. Hobbes frames it like this: "If your company is employing you they are making money off of you, and you are entitled to some percentage of that money."
  • Advice for millennials: Don't plead poverty to get a raise. State your value, or job hop to a company that will pay you more.

Our top 10 economic forecasts for 2019

The sharp drop-off in world trade growth is a major risk in the coming year.

The global economy started 2018 with strong, synchronized growth. But as the year progressed, momentum faded and growth trends diverged. The US economy accelerated, thanks to fiscal stimulus enacted early in the year, while the economies of the Eurozone, the UK, Japan and China began to weaken. These divergent trends will persist in 2019. IHS Markit predicts global growth will edge down from 3.2% in 2018 to 3.1% in 2019, and keep decelerating over the next few years.

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What would happen if America defaulted on its debt?

Sure we know it would be bad, but what do all of these scary numbers really mean?

  • At the press time, the value was $21.7 trillion dollars.
  • Lots of people know that a default would be bad, but not everybody seems to get how horrible it would be.
  • While the risk is low, knowing what would happen if a default did occur is important information for all voters.
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If money can make you happy, does debt make you sad?

Does money, even when borrowed, make us happier – or does the state of owing money add to our dissatisfaction and stress?

A man dressed as banker swims with a giant mock Swiss bank note during the 71st 'Coupe de Noel' Christmas swimming cup in Lake Geneva on december 14, 2008 in Geneva. (Photo credit: FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Humans have long debated the adage ‘Money can’t buy you happiness.’ Popular opinion suggests that, indeed, it cannot, but more recently researchers have challenged this notion. Based on extensive studies, investigators found that money, or income, can contribute to your happiness. In our capitalist society, income leads to increases in happiness to the extent that funds are required to attain the things that lead to happiness. By meeting needs for shelter or food, allowing the purchase of a home or groceries, or opening the window to experiences such as adventure or travel, money can increase our sense of satisfaction with life. 

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