Astronomers figure out why some galaxies are missing dark matter

A new study found the possible reason why some dwarf galaxies appear to not have dark matter.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Livio and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team (STScI)
  • A new paper presents a possible reason for why some dwarf galaxies appear to be missing dark matter.
  • The researchers at the University of California, Riverside ran cosmological simulations to find the answers.
  • They discovered some galaxies were stripped of dark matter through extreme tidal loss.
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One billion galaxies: Astronomers unveil largest sky map ever made

Scientists with the the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) Legacy Imaging Surveys spent six years creating a detailed map of more than 1 billion galaxies.

Credit: DESI/Legacy Survey Sky Viewer
  • An international team of scientists created the world's largest astronomical map in an effort to better understand dark energy.
  • Dark energy is the force that's thought to be driving the expansion of the universe.
  • The ultimate goal of the team is to develop a three-dimensional map of the universe, which could help scientists unravel the mysteries of dark energy.
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Dark energy: The apocalyptic wild card of the universe

Dr. Katie Mack explains what dark energy is and two ways it could one day destroy the universe.

  • The universe is expanding faster and faster. Whether this acceleration will end in a Big Rip or will reverse and contract into a Big Crunch is not yet understood, and neither is the invisible force causing that expansion: dark energy.
  • Physicist Dr. Katie Mack explains the difference between dark matter, dark energy, and phantom dark energy, and shares what scientists think the mysterious force is, its effect on space, and how, billions of years from now, it could cause peak cosmic destruction.
  • The Big Rip seems more probable than a Big Crunch at this point in time, but scientists still have much to learn before they can determine the ultimate fate of the universe. "If we figure out what [dark energy is] doing, if we figure out what it's made of, how it's going to change in the future, then we will have a much better idea for how the universe will end," says Mack.
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Dark matter axions possibly found near Magnificent 7 neutron stars

A new study proposes mysterious axions may be found in X-rays coming from a cluster of neutron stars.

Credit: D. Ducros; ESA/XMM-Newton, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
  • A study led by Berkeley Lab suggests axions may be present near neutron stars known as the Magnificent Seven.
  • The axions, theorized fundamental particles, could be found in the high-energy X-rays emitted from the stars.
  • Axions have yet to be observed directly and may be responsible for the elusive dark matter.
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    Are we living in a baby universe that looks like a black hole to outsiders?

    Baby universes led to black holes and dark matter, proposes a new study.

    Credit: Kavli IPMU
    • Researchers recently used a huge telescope in Hawaii to study primordial black holes.
    • These black holes might have formed in the early days from baby universes and may be responsible for dark matter.
    • The study also raises the possibility that our own universe may look like a black hole to outside observers.
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