Marijuana improves couple intimacy, new research suggests

Couples who use marijuana experience greater intimacy.

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  • New studies suggest positive benefits of marijuana use by couples.
  • Whether one or both use it, relationship intimacy can improve.
  • Previous studies found that marijuana boosts sex lives.
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Sex & Relationships

How the hard-man mask can affect a prisoner’s sense of self

What happens to a person's identity when they are forced to play a hypermasculine role just to survive?

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  • Prison is not a place where it pays to be vulnerable.
  • Living in prison involves survival through developing a front, or a mask to live behind.
  • Many men in prison develop a hypermasculine sense of self that shows no fear, emotion or distress to cope with the threatening overtones of the prison community.
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Mind & Brain

Mexico plans to decriminalize all illegal drugs

"Prohibitionist strategy is unsustainable," reads the policy plan.

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  • Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has long called for reformations to the nation's drug laws.
  • The five-year policy plan calls for prescribing treatment programs instead of punishments to drug users.
  • It's unclear what effects the laws would have on Mexican cartels, which make the bulk of their money selling drugs in the U.S.
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Politics & Current Affairs

In U.S. first, drug company faces criminal charges for distributing opioids

It marks a major shift in the government's battle against the opioid crisis.

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  • The nation's sixth-largest drug distributor is facing criminal charges related to failing to report suspicious drug orders, among other things.
  • It marks the first time a drug company has faced criminal charges for distributing opioids.
  • Since 1997, nearly 222,000 Americans have died from prescription opioids, partly thanks to unethical doctors who abuse the system.
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Politics & Current Affairs

700,000 people get out of prison each year. Let’s hire them.

The U.S. has a talent shortage and the formerly incarcerated have paid their debt to society. Let's solve two problems with one idea.

  • The U.S. has a talent shortage. There are 7.3 million open jobs, and only 6 million people currently looking for jobs, says President and CEO of SHRM Johnny C. Taylor, Jr.
  • The solution? Let the formerly incarcerated work good jobs that contribute to the economy.
  • SHRM research shows that 80% of HR managers are interested and willing to hire the formerly incarcerated. The bias exists at the employee and customer level – but that bias is changing fast for the better.
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