Russia to replace Wikipedia with the 'Great Russian Encyclopaedia'

The encyclopedia offers more "reliable" information than Wikipedia, said Russian President Vladimir Putin.


Mikhail Svetlov
/ Contributor
  • A government resolution said the measure will ensure that "reliable information that is constantly updated on the basis of scientifically verified sources of knowledge."
  • The move is likely part of Russia's effort to crack down on citizens' internet access.
  • Russia has centuries-old history of censorship, and state officials have even been observed to edit Wikipedia articles to serve Russian interests.
Keep reading Show less

"Cocaine of the sea" — the illegal fish trade of the Mexican cartel and Chinese mafia

"Sea of Shadows" is a documentary you can't afford to miss.

National Geographic
  • "Sea of Shadows" tells the story of an illegal fish trade between the Mexican cartel and Chinese mafia.
  • The fish bladders, bought for $5,000 from local fisherman, are sold in China for over $100,000 to make an unproven medicine.
  • Director Richard Ladkani talks about the intensity and danger of making this film, as well as the hopeful ending.
Keep reading Show less

Would a wealth tax in America work? Yes, argues Berkeley economist Gabriel Zucman.

According to recent papers by Zucman, and his colleague Emmanuel Saez, one should be implemented.

Photo by Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images
  • French economist, Gabriel Zucman, argues that a wealth tax needs to be implemented to level the economic playing field.
  • Zucman helped both Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren draft their wealth tax proposals.
  • Zucman was also part of the discovered American billionaires now pay a lower tax rate than the middle class.
Keep reading Show less

Why the illusory truth effect works

Repeating lies makes people believe they are true, show studies.

  • Two recent studies looked at the illusory truth effect.
  • The effect describes our propensity to start believing untrue statements if they are repeated.
  • The phenomenon is a universal bias linked to cognitive fluency but can be counterbalanced.
Keep reading Show less

To overthrow a tyrant, try the 3.5 Percent Solution

A study of 323 uprisings against repressive regimes yields stunning insights.

  • No democracy movement has ever failed when it was able to mobilize at least 3.5 percent of the population to protest over a sustained period
  • At that scale, most soldiers have no desire to suppress protesters. Why? Because the crowd includes their family members, friends, coworkers, and neighbors.
  • With a population of 327 million, the U.S. would need to mobilize about 11.5 million people to assert popular, democratic power on the government. Could that happen?
Keep reading Show less