It's never really now: 4 ways your brain plays with time

We don't perceive time in an objective fashion; instead, the brain interprets time in a complex and amorphous way.

Photo by Icons8 team on Unsplash
  • Time seems like it flows steadily from the past to the future. In fact, this is a complicated illusion that our brains work hard to create.
  • In reality, our brains are constantly managing our perception of time.
  • These four temporal illusions demonstrate the subjective nature of time and the influence the subconscious has over our lived experience.
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Mind & Brain

7 new things we’ve learned about the brain

Brain plasticity. Mindful superpowers. Pokémon invading our grey matter. Scientists have only begun to learn about the human brain.

  • In 1848, Phineaus Gage kicked off our modern neuroscience after blasting a tamping iron through his skull.
  • We explore 7 things scientists have since learned about this important, complex organ.
  • Many mysteries remain such as where consciousness originates and how we evolved such a multipurpose mind.
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Mind & Brain

Where does intelligence reside in the brain?

There are a few different theories out there, but the parieto-frontal integration theory, or P-FIT, appears to give us the best model of the neuroscience of intelligence.

  • Intelligence is such a complex phenomenon that it's difficult to imagine specific regions of the brain could be responsible for greater, lesser, or different varieties of intelligence.
  • However, neuroimaging and brain lesion research has enabled us to pinpoint the neural networks that are most likely to be involved in intelligence.
  • The best contender thus far is the parieto-frontal integration theory, or P-FIT, although other models of the neuroscience of intelligence exist.
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Mind & Brain

Here's how to prove that you are a simulation and nothing is real

How do you know you are real? A classic paper by philosopher Nick Bostrom argues you are likely a simulation.

  • Philosopher Nick Bostrom argues that humans are likely computer simulations in the "Simulation Hypothesis".
  • Bostrom thinks advanced civilizations of posthumans will have technology to simulate their ancestors.
  • Elon Musk and others support this idea.
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Mind & Brain

Mind-altering drugs: The magical history of LSD and mushrooms

Why did government officials stop psychedelics from reaching mainstream culture?

  • In the '60s drugs escape the lab and become a very important ingredient In the creation of the counterculture. Timothy Leary, a psychologist at Harvard in 1960, has something to do with this.
  • In Cambridge, he starts the Harvard Psilocybin Project which focuses its research into learning more about this promising drug. Because of its medicinal properties, and apparent positive effect on mental health, Leary believed that everyone should use acid, or psilocybin.
  • Richard Nixon called Leary the most dangerous man in America. He felt that LSD and other drugs were sapping the will of American boys to fight in Vietnam.
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