Control group outperforms mediums in psychic test

Some volunteers performed above chance. They weren't the psychics.

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  • A control group outperformed professional mediums in a psychic test.
  • This contradicted previous research the team performed in which mediums scored above chance levels.
  • For this study, every volunteer had to guess the cause of death after being given three choices.
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Mind uploading: Can we become immortal?

Is the quest to upload human consciousness and ditch our meat puppets the future—or is it fool's gold?

  • Technology has evolved to a point where humans have overridden natural selection. So what will our species become? Immortal interstellar travelers, perhaps.
  • Scientists are currently mapping the human brain in an effort to understand the connections that produce consciousness. If we can re-create consciousness, your mind can live on forever. You could even laser-port your consciousness to different planets at the speed of light, download your mind into a local avatar and explore those worlds.
  • But is this transhumanist vision of the future real or is it a pipedream? And if it is real, is it wise? Join theoretical physicist Michio Kaku, neuroscientist David Eagleman, human performance researcher Steven Kotler, skeptic Michael Shermer, cultural theorist Douglas Rushkoff and futurist Jason Silva.
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Psychedelics: The scientific renaissance of mind-altering drugs

There is a lot we don't know about psychedelics, but what we do know makes them extremely important.

  • Having been repressed in the 1960s for their ties to the counterculture, psychedelics are currently experiencing a scientific resurgence. In this video, Michael Pollan, Sam Harris, Jason Silva and Ben Goertzel discuss the history of psychedelics like LSD and psilocybin, acknowledge key figures including Timothy Leary and Albert Hoffman, share what the experience of therapeutic tripping can entail, and explain why these substances are important to the future of mental health.
  • There is a stigma surrounding psychedelic drugs that some scientists and researchers argue is undeserved. Several experiments over the past decades have shown that, when used correctly, drugs like psilocybin and LSD can have positive effects on the lives of those take them. How they work is not completely understood, but the empirical evidence shows promise in the fields of curbing depression, anxiety, obsession, and even addiction to other substances.
  • "There's a tremendous amount of insight that can be plumbed using these various substances. There's also a lot of risks there, as with most valuable things," says artificial intelligence researcher Ben Goertzel. He and others believe that by making psychedelics illegal, modern governments are getting in the way of meaningful research and the development of "cultural institutions to guide people in really productive use of these substances."
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Scientists urge UN to add 'neuro-rights' to Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Neuroscientists and ethicists wants to ensure that neurotechnologies remain benevolent.

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  • Columbia University neuroscience professor Rafael Yuste is advocating for the UN to adopt "neuro-rights."
  • Neurotechnology is a growing field that includes a range of technologies that influence higher brain activities.
  • Ethicists fear that these technologies will be misused and abuses of privacy and even consciousness could follow.
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New bed, no sleep? First night blues

Heard about the phenomenon of FNE, or 'first night effect'?

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Have you ever woken up in a new place and noted with disappointment that you are still tired?

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