Louis C.K., #MeToo, and accountability: Why binary thinking doesn't help

We may not learn and grow beyond the #MeToo era if we keep thinking in black and white, says comedian Pete Holmes.

  • The collective suffering society is going through with the #MeToo movement is the earmark that real change is happening, says comedian Pete Holmes. Abusers need to acknowledge their wrongdoing and, where possible, be open about their evolution and growth.
  • Comedian Louis C.K.'s abuses and return to the stage have divided the comedy community and society on a broader scale. The debate predominately has two narratives: Either C.K. is a monster, or he is a symbol of artistic freedom.
  • The truth, says Holmes, is likely in the middle, and our need to take a binary stance won't help us confront and grow from these complicated issues.
Keep reading Show less
Videos

Listen to (what’s likely) Frida Kahlo’s voice

The iconic 20th-century artist might not sound how you'd expect.

Photo credit: MIGUEL MEDINA / AFP / Getty Images
  • Experts at the National Sound Library of Mexico may have discovered the first known voice recording of Frida Kahlo.
  • The tape was found in the archives of a late radio personality.
  • With her unforgettably surreal (and often painful) self-portraits, Kahlo challenged 20th-century notions of sexuality, class, and gender.

The National Sound Library of Mexico has discovered what could be the first known voice recording of the iconic artist Frida Kahlo.

"Frida's voice has always been a great enigma, a never-ending search," Pável Granados, director of the sound library, said at a press conference.

The recording was found in the archives of late radio personality Alvaro "The Bachelor" Galvez y Fuentes. On it, a female voice reads from Kahlo's essay "Portrait of Diego" for a radio program about Mexican artist Diego Rivera, Kahlo's husband.

"He is a gigantic, immense child, with a friendly face and a sad gaze," the voice says. "His high, dark, extremely intelligent and big eyes rarely hold still. They almost come out of their sockets because of their swollen and protuberant eyelids — like a toad's. They allow his gaze to take in a much wider visual field, as if they were built especially for a painter of large spaces and crowds."

The speaker is thought to be Kahlo because she's introduced as the female painter "who no longer exists." (Kahlo died in 1954 at age 47.) Researchers are analyzing the tape to confirm it's Kahlo, and they plan to search the archives in hopes of finding other potential recordings of the artist, whose voice was once described as "melodious and warm" by Gisèle Freund, a French photographer and friend of Kahlo.

"Melodious and warm" — or however you'd describe the voice in the recording — seems at odds with Kahlo's painting style, which is often described as brooding and painful.

"I was expecting something slow and pained, dark and moody," Waldemar Januszczak, a British art critic, told The New York Times. "Instead, she's as chirpy as a schoolgirl reading her mum a poem. . . Where did all the angst go? So much younger and happier than anyone would have thought."

"Girl with Death Mask" [Niña con máscara de calavera] by Frida Kahlo

Kahlo is still celebrated today because her work viscerally challenged 20th-century conventions of gender, class, and sexuality. As Mexico's Culture Minister Alejandra Frausto said, she remains "one of the most iconic cultural personalities there is."

Culture & Religion

23% of young black women now identify as bisexual

Among women, bisexuality is statistically on the rise.

MAURO PIMENTEL/AFP/Getty Images

Since 1972, social scientists have studied the General Social Survey to chart the complexities of social change in the United States.

Keep reading Show less
Sex & Relationships

Men who receive paternity leave want fewer children

A new study in Spain displays the powerful effects of empathy.

Photo by Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images
  • Men that take paid paternity leave in Spain are less likely to want more children in the future.
  • The study's authors believe that men become more aware of the overall costs of raising children.
  • Before the service was enacted, women spent 4.2 hours engaged in unpaid childcare labor compared to 1.3 hours by men.
Keep reading Show less
Culture & Religion

5 new female-led companies achieve billion-dollar status

That's five more unicorns than the previous three years combined.

Photo credit: Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for Fast Company
  • Five female-led tech startups have achieved unicorn status — $1B valuation — this year.
  • Ellevest CEO and cofounder Sallie Krawcheck says that women need to begin negotiating on day one in their career.
  • Krawcheck also notes that the upcoming "retirement savings crisis" is really a women's crisis.
Keep reading Show less
Technology & Innovation