Are humans hardwired for monogamy?

Evolution steered humans toward pair bonding to ensure the survival of genes. But humans tend to get restless.

  • Monogamy is natural, but adultery is, too, says biological anthropologist Helen Fisher.
  • Even though humans are animals that form pair bonds, some humans have a predisposition for restlessness. This might come from the evolutionary development of a dual human reproductive strategy.
  • This drive to fall in love and form a pair bond evolved for an ecological reason: to rear our children as a team.
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Grandmas may be key to species survival, says new study

New research on killer whales may shine a light on the evolutionary power of menopause.

Photo Credit: Dan Antoche-Albisor / Getty Images
  • New research on killer whales suggests that post-menopausal grandmothers play a powerful role in the survival of generations that follow them.
  • "The Grandmother Hypothesis," theorizes that by surviving long past menopause, a woman improves the survival and reproduction of her children's children and, thus, her own genes.
  • Not only do grandma whales help raise and share their own food with their grandoffspring, they bequeath decades of foraging wisdom onto the next generation, guiding them to the best feeding spots.
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Is artificial-womb technology a tool for women’s liberation?

The blood, sweat, and tears might not be so intrinsic to the process after all.

Hubert Fanthomme/Paris Match via Getty Images

While some women experience pregnancy and childbirth as joyful, natural and fulfilling, others find themselves recoiling in horror at the physical demands of carrying and sustaining a child in their womb, and even more so at the potential brutality of giving birth.

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William Shatner: Empathy must be taught

What a group of orphaned elephants can teach us about emotion and learned social skills.

  • Empathy is defined as the act of recognizing, understanding, and being sensitive to the feelings and experiences of others.
  • Sharing a story about young elephants at a nature preserve, William Shatner argues that empathy is a learned skill, not an inherited trait.
  • "That has to be learned, and I don't think it's any different from a boy to a girl. You have to walk in the shoes to experience what the other person is experiencing."
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Women dress modestly to avoid aggression from other women, study suggests

Attractive women are especially likely to dress modestly, but only in certain scenarios.

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  • Psychologists have long studied male intrasexual aggression, but women's is relatively understudied.
  • Past research shows that women tend to be more aggressive toward women who are attractive or who display signs of sexual permissiveness.
  • The results of a new study suggest that women make strategic decisions on what to wear in order to minimize aggression from other women.
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