Greta Thunberg is not a 'caricatural woman,' says Slavoj Žižek — her approach is 'brutal'

What image of femininity is subtly imposed on us in the war against toxic masculinity?

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  • Slavoj Žižek is a Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic whose diverse body of work often emphasizes the role of ideology in culture and capitalism.
  • In a recent interview, Žižek described how the war against so-called toxic masculinity necessarily implies a certain image of femininity.
  • Žižek suggests we should be wary of accepting this image of femininity without closer examination.
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Hormone Hacking: How to engineer your quality of life

Has misinformation clouded our understanding of the anti-aging power of hormones?

  • Hormone therapy and supplementation have often been associated with cancer and unwanted side effects.
  • However, this connection is fueled by misinformation and faulty sources of testosterone and estrogen outside the human body.
  • When taken correctly, bioidentical hormone supplements can dial back the aging process and spark a zest for life while decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in both men and women.
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What young people around the world want most in a partner

A new study finds an unexpected trait that young people want in a lifelong partner.

Credit: OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images.
  • A new study from the UK looked at dating preferences of 2,700 international students.
  • The study found that kindness was the top trait preferred by both men and women in a lifelong partner.
  • Looks, financial stability and a sense of humor were also important but with differences across cultures.
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Why Simone de Beauvoir didn’t believe in being ‘a strong woman’

De Beauvoir finds that the ‘strong woman’ is actually just bound to housework

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In The Second Sex (1949), Simone de Beauvoir argued that women were at a disadvantage in a society where they grew up under 'a multiplicity of incompatible myths' about women.

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There are 12 million stateless people in the world. Who are they?

Without a country to belong to, many of these people lack some of the most fundamental rights.

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  • According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the world is host to 12 million people who don't officially belong to any state.
  • People can become stateless through a variety of means, including racial discrimination, sexist nationality laws, voluntary choice, or bureaucratic accidents.
  • Who are these millions of stateless individuals? What is life like for them? Can their situation be solved?
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