Child abuse cases quadruple when report cards are sent home on Fridays

Florida researchers offer schools a simple message: Send home report cards earlier in the week.

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash
  • Researchers discovered a four-fold increase in verified cases of child abuse when report cards were sent home on Friday as compared to other days.
  • Corporal punishment is legal throughout America, including in many public and most private schools.
  • A child is hit, on average, every 30 seconds in American public schools.
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How financial literacy impacts youth prostitution, AIDS, and women’s survival

Financial literacy programs turns girls into powerful economic contributors.

  • Around the world, girls are in positions of extreme vulnerability and risk. How can we increase the survival and empowerment of girls and women who have no education, who are married off as children, forced into prostitution, and who live in regions where AIDS/HIV is common?
  • One proven strategy is financial literacy programs, from as early as age six. It is the bedrock of change. When girls understand finance, savings, and how to think assess opportunity and risk, it is proven to impact seemingly unrelated areas of life, such as understanding their risk of contracting HIV/AIDS, explains Judith Bruce.
  • Invest in the poorest girls in the poorest countries early, says Bruce. Financial literacy affects their future decisions on health, education, and gives them their own economic agency. This benefits flow on to their children and will build a better, safer world.

Smart dress groped 157 times in under 4 hours

Technology proves what women know and men may not want to hear

(Ogilvy)
  • Schweppes commissioned research into how often women are touched by strangers
  • A sensor-equipped dress designed by Ogilvy captured the party experience of three women
  • The experiment confirms for men what women have known all along
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Why whistleblowing is the loneliest and most courageous act in the world

'Whose job is it to fix the bad stuff in the world?' asks Alice Dreger.

  • Living with integrity means being able to fall asleep at night having asked and answered these questions: Did I treat other people well today? Did I uphold the principles that I really care about? Did I take care of injustice?
  • If you feel you need to call out bad behavior or blow the whistle on injustice, Alice Dreger offers this advice: "Can you get other people to do it with you? That will often help lighten the blow of the backlash. And then, can you afford to lose what it is you might lose?"
  • Choose your battles—you cannot fix everything. But, says Dreger, if more people called out injustice when they saw it, the world would be infinitely better to live in for all of us.


Initial conversations go better than people think

A new study suggests that we all underestimate how much people like us after a first meeting.

Pulp Fiction
  • A new study finds that people consistently underestimate how much a new conversation partner liked them.
  • The likability gap exists for almost everybody, but is more pronounced for the shy. It can also last for months despite regular meetings with the same person.
  • The findings suggest we all try to play it safe with our appraisals of how much we're liked, and point the way to better conversational habits for everybody.
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