The hackable technology that worries even a legendary con man

Before we release new technology into the ether, we need to make safeguards so that bad actors can't misuse them.

  • Right now cybercrime is basically a financial crime — it's a business of stealing people's money or stealing their data. Data has value.
  • We develop a lot of technology — we need to always ask the question how the new innovation can be misused and make safeguards so that it cannot be done.
  • Because we currently don't do these things, we have hackable vehicles, pacemakers, and laptops.
Keep reading Show less

How to outsmart a scam: Strategies from a legendary con man

Frank W. Abagnale says scammers don't discriminate — here's what you can do to protect yourself.

  • In today's world, anyone can be targeted by scams -- even famous con man Frank W. Abagnale. For this reason he shares his top advice for protecting yourself against fraud.
  • When receiving a suspicious call, be aware of the two major red flags of immediacy and info-sharing. Is the person asking for money, and they need it right now? Does the person want sensitive personal information like a social security number or date of birth? If the answer to either of those questions is yes, it's probably a scam.
  • Scammers obtain much of their info from a victim's social media accounts. Caution is key for prevention, and education is the most powerful tool in outsmarting this type of crime.
Keep reading Show less

U.S. in Top 10 of most dangerous countries for women

#MeToo and #TimesUp catapult America into the club of world's most anti-women countries

Image: Statista / Thomson Reuters Foundation (CC)
  • India tops a global ranking of most dangerous countries for women
  • Most other countries in the Top 10 cluster together in an Indo-Arab-African window of 'female-unfriendliness'
  • One outlier: the United States – 10th most dangerous country for women
Keep reading Show less

Criminal reform: Why wake-up calls are windows of opportunity

Here's how we can use the concept of "impact impression" for criminal reform.

  • In his work in criminal reform, Bishop Omar Jahwar recounts how a person's life trajectory can typically be traced back to a moment of trauma or an 'impact impression'.
  • An impact impression has two outcomes: It can be an awakening that steers people in a positive direction where they seek help, or it can become a negative spiral that lands them in prison. In the latter case, supporting people in undoing the damage and mental scars they've incurred from such impact impressions can help reduce recidivism.
  • The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect.

Women fear violence. Men? Ridicule.

In her new Netflix special, Amy Schumer gets real about fear.


Jemal Countess
/ Stringer (Getty Images)
  • In Growing, Amy Schumer says women fear violence most, while for men it's ridicule.
  • She points to grade school, when boys being violent to girls is supposed to represent courting.
  • About 91 percent of rape victims are women, creating a fear in women that men rarely have to endure.
Keep reading Show less