Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education?

When measuring for the future, there is much to consider.

  • We need to embrace a plethora of schooling options as necessary to help different types of learners get to success.
  • On top of testing for literacy and math competence, we should also test for other things that are clearly important to parents, such as whether kids feel safe and cared for. These things are softer but more difficult to assess.
  • To improve our education system, we need to understand we currently only have answers to some huge open questions right now. We are still figuring things out on how to enrich different people's lives as they find their positions in the economy — and society at large.
  • This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
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Does digital technology make students stupid?

Conventional wisdom believes "screen time" disrupts mental development, but research hints at a more complicated relationship between our minds and digital technology.

  • Worry over test scores has led many to blame digital technology for waning educational achievement.
  • New studies show that the persistent effects of "screen time" are not yet understood and may be short-lived.
  • Many experts argue the best approach is to teach students the strategic and selective use of digital technology.
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How can we best help students? Cultivate their love for learning.

So much has changed since 1893. Why not the education system?

  • In 1893, a committee of ten leaders in education chaired by Charles Eliot, the president of Harvard University, produced a report that aimed to unify the various education systems and philosophies across America, with the goal of giving the same education to everyone.
  • That framework is still operating in the U.S. today—but should it be? John Hardin, vice president of Stand Together Ventures, points out that this uniform approach does not take into account the unique interests and skills of each kid. It might even squash children's love of learning, rather than cultivating it.
  • This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
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Redefining the “experts” in education reform might be the key to success

Can we radically shift our perception of who should be enacting real change in K-12 education?

  • The right kind of education reform will happen with people instead of to people.
  • Part of this requires redefining who the "experts" are in education. It might be beneficial to loosen control on the part of those that train principals and teachers.
  • If educators can view themselves as hosts to the conversation of what schools could look like, the movement for change becomes more courageous.
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How academic freedom strengthens the bonds of accumulated knowledge

As humans, we teach each other. But do we take for granted our freedom to do so?

  • Humans are unique in that we learn socially and actively teach each other lessons of survival.
  • Freedom of expression allows accumulated knowledge, that which is passed down through generations and across cultures, to flourish within and benefit society.
  • The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect.
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