How to live an intellectual life

Being an intellectual is not really how it is depicted in popular culture.

  • When you picture an intellectual, who do you see? Professor Zena Hitz says that somewhere along the way, the idea of what an intellectual is and does became distorted.
  • "The real thing is something more extraordinary but also more available to us," Hitz adds, differentiating between an intellectual life constantly in pursuit of something else, and one that enjoys ordinary activities like reading and thinking.
  • An example is young Albert Einstein, who spoke highly of his time working in a patent office and hatching "beautiful ideas" long before becoming a famous physicist.


Keep reading Show less
  • Learning a foreign language can be daunting, but immersive training can help you sound like a local faster than you think.
  • The critically acclaimed Rosetta Stone language-learning method has been trusted for over 26 years and offers over 24 languages you can learn from your phone, computer, or tablet.
  • You can sign up for a one-year subscription and get access to unlimited languages for $99.99 (44% off) for a limited time.
Keep reading Show less

4 tips for college students to avoid procrastinating with their online work

More than 70% of college students procrastinate

Photo by Callum T on Unsplash

If you take classes online, chances are you probably procrastinate from time to time.

Keep reading Show less

The way we teach science misses something key: Human context

Why do we deprive students of the historical and cultural context of science?

Credit: Adobe Stock via Archivist and stta
  • The teaching of science must and can be humanized at all levels, from nonscience courses to technical advanced courses.
  • By teaching science only as a technical endeavor, we deprive students and future scientists of a more inclusive worldview where science is seen as part of our human need to make sense of the world.
  • The challenges we face in the modern world call for an engagement of the sciences and the humanities that starts in the classroom and becomes an essential aspect of the public sphere.
Keep reading Show less

What is the purpose of universities?

For centuries, universities have advanced humanity toward truth. Professor Jonathan Haidt speaks to why college campuses are suddenly heading in the opposite direction.

Credit: Institute for Humane Studies, and Adobe Stock
  • In a lecture at UCCS, NYU professor Jonathan Haidt considers the 'telos' or purpose of universities: To discover truth.
  • Universities that prioritize the emotional comfort of students over the pursuit of truth fail to deliver on that purpose, at a great societal cost.
  • To make that point, Haidt quotes CNN contributor Van Jones: "I don't want you to be safe ideologically. I don't want you to be safe emotionally. I want you to be strong—that's different."
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast