Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Rutgers University adjusts grammar rules in solidarity with Black Lives Matter​

The English Department is instituting a series of reforms that cuts across the entire university.

Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images
  • Rutgers University's English department is instituting anti-racist policies, workshops, and initiatives in solidarity with Black Lives Matter.
  • Linguistic diversity and less emphasis on "traditional" grammar will be honored across the department's courses.
  • Jonathan Holloway, the college's first Black president, said the school name will not change despite slaves having built the original institution.
Keep reading Show less

The unexpected key to student engagement? Dignity.

What happens when someone you respect doesn't treat others with dignity?

  • Respect and dignity are sometimes conflated, but Cultures of Dignity founder Rosalind Wiseman argues that they are very different.
  • Dignity, according to Wiseman, is the essential and inextricable worth of a person. Respect is the admiration for someone's actions, which often involves how they treat others. The rub comes when people in positions of authority and respect (for example, our elders) behave in ways undeserving of that admiration but are seemingly above reprimanding.
  • "This is actually one of the biggest problems for young people in education," Wiseman says, adding that when that loss of respect and dignity hits home for students, they tend to disengage from learning. "If I could change something about education, it would be to have dignity be a bedrock of education and that everyone—the teachers, the parents, the students, the staff, everyone, the administrators—has to be treated with dignity."
Keep reading Show less

How learning journals can help students grow

Even non-academic experiences can inspire meaningful moments of learning and self-reflection.

  • Jiang Xueqin, an educator and researcher at Harvard Graduate School of Education, endorses learning journals as a good method to promote meta-learning for students during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Learning journals can be kept for any activity and have three components: defining a goal "concretely and precisely," writing down the process, and writing down observations and reflecting on the experience.
  • While learning journals are primarily a personal exercise, Xueqin says that teachers can play a crucial role as coaches who motivate the student and find ways for them to improve with new learning strategies.
Keep reading Show less

Google to fund 100,000 online certificate scholarships

The Silicon Valley titan has promised scholarships for its tech-focused certificate courses alongside $10 million in job training grants.

  • America is facing a "middle-skills gap" thanks to the rapid digitalization of work.
  • Google announces new online certificate courses and 100,000 need-based scholarships to train people for in-demand skills.
  • The need for middle-skills will grow as the COVID-19 pandemic hastens technological adoption.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Why schools should teach habits of mind, not “college readiness”

    Helping students get better at learning prepares them for life, not just higher education.

    • What does it mean to prepare students for college and why is that the goal? Bena Kallick, co-director of the Institute for Habits of Mind and program director for Eduplanet21, argues that a shift has to be made. Schools should instead be helping learners by preparing them for life, not just higher education.
    • Developed by Kallick and Arthur Costa, habits of mind are 16 problem-solving life skills designed to help people navigate real-life situations. College is not the best fit for everyone, which means that teaching college readiness is not in the best interest of all learners.
    • In order for meaningful changes to higher education to work, it has to start at the K-12 level. Students have to be "certified as human beings who are good at learning, who know enough about themselves to know what interests them and how to step out of K-12 and walk into a world of options."
    Keep reading Show less
    Quantcast